• Tag Archives VIC-20
  • Commodore: The MicroComputer Magazine – Issue Number 27 (1983)


    Source: Commodore: The MicroComputer Magazine – Issue Number 27 – 1983



    Commodore: The MicroComputer Magazine was one of Commodore’s early official publications. In 1983 when this issue was published, Commodore was still yet to reach its peak. The VIC-20 had been around a couple of years and was around the 1 million in sales mark and would be the first home computer to reach that number. The Commodore 64 was brand new and would become the best selling home computer of all time. Older machines like the PET were still around too. This issue includes:

    Features

    • In the Chips – Where microchips came from and how they are made.
    • Millions and the Microchip – How many times is a million times a second? Jim takes a look at the scales of time and size as they relate to your computer.
    • The Logic of Bits and Pieces – Part 2 in Jeff’s series explains two-state logic and how it works in your computer.
    • 6502 Op-Codes – For the more technical among you, we’ve provided a list of all the 6502 op-codes with a description of what they do and how they affect the status register.

    Departments

    • Editor’s Notes
    • Letters – Our readers offer opinions and advice
    • Commodore News – Happy 25th Birthday Commodore!
    • Business – Spread Sheet Programs: Expensive Gimmicks or Management Tools?
    • Education
      • Lincoln College Commodore Computer Club
      • The Commuting Commodore
      • Educational Programming: A Method
    • Program Review – Easy Spell 64
    • The Arts – Creating and Photographing Computer Screens
    • Programmer’s Tips
      • On the Merits of Touching Up the X-Rays
      • Random Thoughts, Part 3
      • Using Picture Format
      • Prints Charming
    • Computer Languages – COMAL Graphics
    • Product Review – Promqueen 64
    • Technical – A Theory of Operation for the VIC/64 Boards
    • Telecommunications
      • The New Commodore Information Network
      • The Model 1650 AUTOMODEM
    • User Departments
      • Commodore 64 – Commodore 64 Sprite Mover
      • PET/CBM – Go Directly to XY!
    • Commodore User Groups
      • User Group Listings – User groups across the nation and around the world.
      • User Bulletin Board – Messages from user groups to user groups.
    • That Does Not Compute… – When we make a mistake, this is where we fix it.
    • New Products – What’s new from independent manufacturers.
    • Advertisers Index

    …and more!


  • Compute!’s Gazette Disk (Commodore 64, VIC-20)


    USA 1985

    https://darth-azrael.tumblr.com/post/185763402937/retrocgadsusa-1985-computes-gazette-disk

    Back in the 8-bit days of computing, it wasn’t as easy to get software (“apps” in modern parlance) as it is today. There was no internet to speak of and centralized online services were expensive and the connections slow. You were mostly stuck finding software at a local retail establishment that sold such things or going through a mail-order company. You could also type-in programs from magazines dedicated to whatever computer you happened to be using. However, this could take many hours.

    Then there were products like Compute!’s Gazette Disk. Compute!’s Gazette was a spin-off of Compute! magazine that focused just on Commodore 8-bit computers like the Commodore 64. In addition to subscribing to the magazine, you could also subscribe to their disk service. With this service you received a disk each month with all of type-in programs from the magazine from that month. It was relatively expensive at about $70 a year but on the other hand that’s less than $6 month typically for several programs. It certainly saved you a load of time if you actually wanted those programs.

    There were several such subscription based disk services over the years. Most magazines dedicated to 8-bit computers had them and there were a few disk only services like Loadstar as well. Some of these services lasted well into the 1990s. Compute!’s Gazette Disk was published until 1995. That’s pretty incredible when you consider that was the time of the Pentium, Power PC and the beginning of the Internet age.