• Tag Archives PSX
  • Quake II (PlayStation)


    Source: Official U.S. PlayStation Magazine – Volume 3, Issue 1 – October 1999

    The Quake series was id’s follow up to the Doom series. At this point in time, first person shooters were still progressing rapidly in terms of the technology and game play features. For instance, in the Doom games you were primarily limited to 2 dimensional movement and shooting at only what was directly in front of you. Quake added the novel feature of being able to look up and down. Quake II was the second game in a series that continues to this day.

    Quake II, like its predecessor and the Doom games before it were all developed first as PC games. Quake II was the first of id’s games to support hardware 3D acceleration out of the box (though it was added in later patches for the original Quake as well). The ad above is for the PlayStation version of Quake II. the PlayStation version (and also the Nintendo 64 version) was released two years after the original PC game. Because of the limitations of the PlayStation, Quake II ran at a lower resolution and featured fewer levels. There were assorted other various changes as well, including some different enemies and music. Despite the PlayStation’s relative limitations, the graphics were still well done. However, there is one huge negative with the PlayStation version. There was no network multiplayer. To me this was the feature that made the Doom and Quake games truly great. The PlayStation version did feature split-screen multiplayer but it’s just not the same.

    There were several official add-ons to Quake II, including The Reckoning, Ground Zero, and Extremeties. However, there were no add-ons released for the PlayStation as such. Also, the source code has been released so there are a number of games, both free and commercial, that were based on that code. Hexen II was my personal favorite.

    If you are a PlayStation collector, then Quake II is still a game worth having. Some may even prefer the split-screen approach for multiplayer. However, for the best Quake II experience, it needs to be played on a PC. Fortunately, there are easy and cheap ways to do this today, including buying the game for $4.99 from Steam. Or you can always go old school and install the original game on a Pentium II.

    The ad above, a rather unique supermarket parody ad, is from the October 1999 issue of The Official U.S. PlayStation Magazine. Screen shots above are from the PlayStation version of the game.




  • GamePro (October 1996)


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    Source: GamePro – October 1996

    GamePro was never one of my favorite gaming magazines. It did have a lot of good content but the organization always seemed…random. Nevertheless, it was a popular and long lasting magazine. The October 1996 issue includes:

    Cover Feature

    • Nintendo 64: The U.S. Launch
      • The N64: It’s Heeeeeeeeeere!
      • Let the Games Begin: N64 Release Calendar
      • The Game Names: Updates on MK Trilogy, Turok: Dinosaur Hunter, and Freak Boy
      • The Cutting Edge: Nintendo 64 Graphics Hardwired
      • Super Mario 64 ProStrategy Guide

    Special Feature

    • Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Gold! – An inside look at LucasArts’ five hot Star Wars games: Shadows of the Empire (N64), Dark Forces (PlayStation), Rebel Assault II (PlayStation), Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II (PC-CD), and X-Wing vs. TIE Fighter (PC-CD).

    SWATPro Strategy Section

    • Super Mario 64 Nintendo 64 ProStrategy Guide – Mario’s most essential moves, how to use camera views, and a breakdown of the first two areas.
    • The Fighter’s Edge Presents: Tekken 2 (PlayStation), Conclusion – Best combos, special moves, linking moves, and throws for the remaining bosses: Anna, Devil, Angel, Bruce, Kuma, Ganryu, Roger, and Alex.
    • SWATPro – Secret coedes and tips! Play as Akuma in X-Men: Children of the Atom, Toshinden 2 boss codes, Game Shark codes, and more!

    ProReviews

    • N64
    • PlayStation
    • Saturn
    • SNES
    • Sports Pages
    • Role-Player’s Realm

    Departments

    • Head-2-Head
    • The Mail
    • Art Attack
    • Buyers Beware
    • ProNews – Johnny Cage will appear in Mortal Kombat Trilogy!
    • GamePro Online – AOL games and hot Web sites
    • GamePro Labs – ASCII Saturn Stick, Psychopad K.O., and Saturn 3D Analog Controller
    • Overseas ProSpects – CoolBoarders and Motor Toon 2!
    • Sneak Previews – Fighting Vipers, Soviet Strike, Treasures of the Deep, Doom, and more!
    • PC GamePro – Starcraft, Interstate ’76, and more!
    • Hot at the Arcades – Soul Edge Version II

    …and more!


  • MLB 98 (PlayStation)


    next_generation_issue_033_sep_97_144

    Source: Next Generation – Issue Number 8 – September 1997

    The PlayStation was the Sega Genesis of the 32-bit generation in terms of sports games. There were a vast number of sports games for the PlayStation but that’s probably mostly because that system dominated the era. The Saturn died an early death and the Nintendo 64 was later in coming and never had the same volume of games because of Nintendo’s licensing and the fact that it used expensive cartridges. MLB 98 was (almost) the start of a long series of baseball games. However, technically MLB Pennant Race was actually the first game in the series.

    MLB 98 is an above average arcade style baseball simulation. However, sports games, particularly ones designed to be realistic, often don’t hold up well over time and this one is really no exception. MLB 98 was a solid baseball game for its time but it wasn’t especially innovative and it has been succeeded by a huge number of better baseball games starting with MLB 99. This particular series of games went on until 2005. World Series Baseball ’98 on the Sega Saturn was probably MLB 98’s most direct competition.

    Unless you are a sports game collector or just have to have every game ever made for the PlayStation then there isn’t much reason to pick this one up. The good news is that if you do want it, it should be dirt cheap. Most sports games (with a few exceptions) lose their value almost instantly. Buying a sports game new is like driving a new car off the lot. It depreciates instantly.

    The ad at the top is from the September 1997 issue of Next Generation. It includes a $10 off coupon if you get the game at Sears. I remember buying games for my Commodore 64 at Sears but by the PlayStation era I don’t think I even looked there…