man William Barnes‏‎, son of Thomas Barnes and N.N.‏.
Born ‎ 1679 at Ireland, died ‎before BEF. 1731 at Chester Co., Pa‎, at most 52 years
Notes for WILLIAM BARNES: Bible Records of Missouri, Volume III
Know all men by these presents, that I Brinsley Barnes, of the county of Wilkes and State of North Carolina, Executor of John Barnes, Sr deceased Estate for consideration or good causes, me hereunte make ordain constitue and appoint my trusty friend James Barnes of the state of Kentucky and county of Estell: Gentlemen, my true and lawful attorney, for me in name and to my use to ask, demand, Recover, or receive, of and from Elijah Barnes of the State of Tennessee, and county of Warren one heirs part of the Increase of a certain Negro woman by the name of Phillis Given and by these presents Granting to said attorney my soul, and full power, and authority, to take persue and follow such Legal courses for the Recovery receiveing and obtaining of the same as I might or could do, and I personally presents and upon the same Receipt acquittance; do perform and execut for me in my name all and singular thing or things which are necessary touching and concerning the increase of the Negre woman as fully throughly, and intirely as I the said Brinsley Barnes in my own person ought or could do; in and about the same, Ratifying allowing and confirming what-soever my said attorney shall lawfully do or cause to be done in and about the Execution of the increase of the said Negro woman by virtue of these presents, in witness whereof I have hereunto, set my hand and seal, August the 13th day 1829.

Married ‎ Feb 16, 1707/1708 at Philadelphia, Pa (approximately 24 years married) to:

woman Elizabeth Key‏‎
Born ‎± 1681 at Ireland, died ‎ at Pa

Child:

1.
man Brinsley Barnes‏
Born ‎ 1715 at County Down, Ulster, Ireland, died ‎ May 5, 1796 at Taylors Creek, Wilkes Co., Nc‎, 80 or 81 years
Bible Records of Missouri, Volume III Know all men by these presents, that I Brinsley Barnes, of the county of Wilkes and State of North Carolina, Executor of John Barnes, Sr deceased Estate for consideration or good causes, me hereunte make ordain constitue and appoint my trusty friend James Barnes of the state of Kentucky and county of Estell: Gentlemen, my true and lawful attorney, for me in name and to my use to ask, demand, Recover, or receive, of and from Elijah Barnes of the State of Tennessee, and county of Warren one heirs part of the Increase of a certain Negro woman by the name of Phillis Given and by these presents Granting to said attorney my soul, and full power, and authority, to take persue and follow such Legal courses for the Recovery receiveing and obtaining of the same as I might or could do, and I personally presents and upon the same Receipt acquittance; do perform and execut for me in my name all and singular thing or things which are necessary touching and concerning the increase of the Negre woman as fully throughly, and intirely as I the said Brinsley Barnes in my own person ought or could do; in and about the same, Ratifying allowing and confirming what-soever my said attorney shall lawfully do or cause to be done in and about the Execution of the increase of the said Negro woman by virtue of these presents, in witness whereof I have hereunto, set my hand and seal, August the 13th day 1829.

From the file of: Contact: James Bruce
Information fro m the Brinsley Barnes line down to Isabella Lucy
Barnes (my line) from Art Wil liams 15925 Choning Ct,
Chesterfield, MO 63017-7313 and was on WFT Vol 8 Tree 176
Also someone else feels John Barnes 1690 Donn, Ireland is the father and
Martha Brinsley is the mother tp
American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI)
BARNES, Brinsley
Birth Date: 170? Birth Place: Pennsylvania
Vo lume: 09 Page Number: 347
Reference: Gen. Column of the " Boston Transcript" . 1906-1941.( The
greatest single source of material for gen. Data for the N. E. area and
for the period 1600-1800. Completely indexed in the Index.): Nov 7, 1932,
5512
Bible Records of Missouri, Volume III
Know all men by these presents, that I Brinsley Barnes, of the county of
Wilkes and State of North Carolina, Executor of John Barnes, Sr deceased
Estate for consideration or go od causes, me hereunte make ordain
constitue and appoint my trusty friend Jam es Barnes of the state of
Kentucky and county of Estell: Gentlemen, my true a nd lawful attorney,
for me in name and to my use to ask, demand, Recover, or receive, of and
from Elijah Barnes of the State of Tennessee, and county of W arren one
heirs part of the Increase of a certain Negro woman by the name of
Phillis Given and by these presents Granting to said attorney my soul,
and full power, and authority, to take persue and follow such Legal
courses for t he Recovery receiveing and obtaining of the same as I might
or could do, and I personally presents and upon the same Receipt
acquittance; do perform and e xecut for me in my name all and singular
thing or things which are necessary touching and concerning the increase
of the Negre woman as fully throughly, a nd intirely as I the said
Brinsley Barnes in my own person ought or could do; in and about the
same, Ratifying allowing and confirming what-soever my said attorney
shall lawfully do or cause to be done in and about the Execution of the
increase of the said Negro woman by virtue of these presents, in witness
whereof I have hereunto, set my hand and seal, August the 13th day 1829.
BA RNES, Brinsley
Birth Date: 170? Birth Place: Pennsylvania
Volume: 09 Pag e Number: 347
Reference: Gen. Column of the " Boston Transcript". 1906-1941. ( The
greatest single source of material for gen. Data for the N.E. area and
for the period 1600-1800. Completely indexed in the Index.): Nov 7, 1932,
5 512

If you have corrections, or comments please contact me. This is work in progress, and I do make mistakes. Terry Pogue at Pogue7001@comcast.net
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Notes for Brinsley Barnes: Listed as a Patriot of the Revolutionary War by the DAR. Although Brinsley did not actively serve in the military, he lent a horse to the Colonial Army. Because of that patriotic act he is listed among the pantheon of war heroes that have been dei-fied by the Daughters of The American Revolution.

He immigrated before 1734 as he paid Taxes in 1734 in Kennett twp., Chester co, PA.
(Ref.45)The Barnes Family, The American Genealogical Research Institute, Arlington, VA. 1717 AD The beginning of the mass migration of Ulster-Scots to the American Colonies Between about 1717 and 1775, large numbers of people, mostly Protestants, left Ulster to settle in America.
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The Barnes clan probably descended from the Viking raiders that came to England in the eighth century to plunder the countryside. Many remained and set-tled in the area near the Irish Sea known as the Scottish lowlands. As Brinsley's Viking heritage burdened his descendants with a violent temper his Scottish ancestry provided them with an economic advantage. It was in Scotland that the Barnes clan learned to make the good whiskey that became the vocation of choice for so many of their Estill County descendants. Except for the occasional intemperate outburst caused by their hot Viking blood most settled down, accepted Christianity and eventually became English citizens. Not too long after Brinsley’s Norse ancestors converted to Christianity, an affair of the heart in the royal court altered the history of England. In fact, the Barnes family is in Estill county today as a result of a love triangle that occurred in 1527. Henry VIII lost his heart to Ann Boylen (she later lost her head to Henry) and asked the Pope to grant him a divorce from the Queen so that he could marry her. The Pope refused and that made Henry mad. So the King decreed that henceforth the English would worship as Protestants rather than Catholics. All of this must have been very confusing to our forefathers. The Vikings were persuaded to stop worshipping Thor and convert to Catholicism as the only sure path to Heaven. Now the good citizens were told they couldn’t be Catholics anymore because the King had taken a fancy to one of his court maidens. One can imagine the befuddlement of the peasants as they tried to make the connection between Henry’s aroused hormones and their need to embrace Protestantism. Although the Barnes family is not noted for being quick on the uptake, some of our ancestors must surely have wondered if giving up Paganism had been such a good idea. Most of the English, including the Barnes clan, acquiesced and Anglicanism became the official religion in England. However, the Irish were not overly concerned about the state of Henry’s hormones and remained loyal to the Catholic Church. The English, of course, were outraged at the Irish for not supporting old Henry. Tensions developed that eventually resulted in open conflict. In time England managed to conquer the Irish but many of the Clans continued to resist English rule. The King and Parliament felt that Ireland could be best pacified by sending over settlers from Scotland to keep the Irish in check. Since the majority of the English had converted to Protestantism the government also felt a divine obligation to provide a Protestant presence in heavily Catholic Ireland. Brinsleys' ancestors and their Scottish neighbors were encouraged to immigrate to Ireland in the early part of the seventeenth century and consequently became known as the Scotch-Irish. As often happens with divinely inspired political decisions, the move proved to be a disaster resulting in a bitter struggle between the Catholics and the Protestants that is yet to be resolved. To entice the Scots to immigrate to Ireland one hundred years leases on farmland at very nominal rents were offered as inducements. When the leases expired during the first half of the eight-eenth cen-tury, the landed aris-tocracy immediately raised the rents. The increased rents were much resented by the tenants. After a century of cheap rents, the descendants of the original settlers had grown accus-tomed to the low rates and being true to their Scottish heritage refused to pay. Fortunately for Brinsley and his fellow Scotch-Irish compatriots there was plenty of cheap land available in the New World. So, they told their landlords where to stick their leases, boarded a ship and headed to America. Brinsley originally settled in Kennett Township, near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania where he married Elizabeth Lindley. They were living in Orange County, NC near Durham by 1768 when Brinsley was one of the signers of a petition to the English Governor and the House of Burgesses in Williamsburg requesting lower fees for recording property deeds. In addition to being renowned for their temper the Barnes are noted for their predilection to parsimony as well. The family later moved to Taylorsville in Wilkes County North Carolina near the Kentucky-Tennessee border where Brinsley died in 1795.
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