Megalextoria
Retro computing and gaming, sci-fi books, tv and movies and other geeky stuff.

Home » Digital Archaeology » Computer Arcana » Computer Folklore » Top or bottom posting; does it really matter?
Show: Today's Messages :: Show Polls :: Message Navigator
E-mail to friend 
Return to the default flat view Create a new topic Submit Reply
Re: Top or bottom posting; does it really matter? [message #411322 is a reply to message #411309] Mon, 27 September 2021 20:10 Go to previous messageGo to previous message
Mike Spencer is currently offline  Mike Spencer
Messages: 966
Registered: January 2012
Karma:
Senior Member
Ahem A Rivet's Shot <steveo@eircom.net> writes:

> On Mon, 27 Sep 2021 10:00:40 +0100
> gareth evans <headstone255@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> But are conventions determined by historical
>> personages some of whom are long dead, or do
>> the later contributors also have a say in what is a convention?
>
> The origins of conventions are generally obscured by time, even when
> everyone involved is present they can be difficult to pin down, whatever
> documentation may remain is usually only a thin remnant of the original
> discussions and thinking. Once established they tend to have enormous
> inertia by virtue of group acceptance and tend only to change if pretty much
> everyone finds them irksome.

Circa 1972, I visited the celebrated Dauphinee Block Shop in
Lunenburg, NS. Three-storey frame building with flat-belt-driven
machinery that made the whole building vibrate.

In the cellar they had a blacksmith shop and that day the smith
was making hooks for attachment to fairly large tackle blocks. He had
several dozen half done and was making the eye by splitting the end of
the iron stock, wrapping the split ends around a mandrel and
forge-welding them shut.

I asked why he was doing it that way as I would have punched or
slot-punched a hole and opened it to desired size, stronger and less
error prone.

"It's stronger that way" was his answer. As I was a young novice
smith and he was a middle-aged career smith, I didn't argue but I
didn't get it.

It was years later, looking at a buoy bell clapper salvaged from
Boston Harbor, that it dawned on me. When Dauphinee's was
established, wrought iron was the article of trade used for anything
"iron". Wrought iron has a grain resembling wood grain. Its
structure is anisotropic. You never [1] make a wrought iron structural
element with a hole under tension near the end of a bar for the same
reason that you don't do that with a 1" pine or oak board; it stresses
the area around the hole in its weakest direction.

Modern "iron" is more properly called "mild steel" and, unlike wrought
iron, it is for practical purposes isotropic.

Dauphinee's had been making tackle since before Bessemer and open
hearth replaced wrought iron with mild steel as the standard article
of commerce. They'd settled, correctly, on the way to make a tension
eye at the end of an iron rod circa 1850 and had been passing that
wisdom on for 120 years.

[1] Never say never. The reason the buoy bell clapper [2] caught my
eye was that it was so corroded that I could plainly see the grain
of the wrought iron from which it was forged. The smith had in
fact punched the eye near the end of the stock but had then forge
welded a strip of iron across the end where it might tear out with
the grain of the strip at right angles to that of the clapper and
thus orthogonal to the direction of tension.

[2] Harold Edgerton collection, MIT.

--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
[Message index]
 
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Read Message
Previous Topic: Re: Windows 11 is now available
Next Topic: The 100 MHz 6502!
Goto Forum:
  

-=] Back to Top [=-
[ Syndicate this forum (XML) ] [ RSS ] [ PDF ]

Current Time: Wed Sep 28 23:57:06 EDT 2022

Total time taken to generate the page: 0.00376 seconds