• Tag Archives Sega
  • Tips & Tricks (November 1997)

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    Source: Tips & Tricks – Issue Number 35 – November 1997

    Tips & Tricks evolved out of VideoGames which itself morphed from VideoGames & Computer Entertainment. While VG&CE was my favorite video game magazine, I never paid much attention to the other two. VideoGames was never as good and while “tips & tricks” were nice, that was never my favorite aspect of the magazine. Having said that, if you wanted game codes and strategies, there was really no better place to go than Tips & Tricks. The November 1997 issue includes:

    Departments

    • Power Up!
    • Readers’ Tips
    • T&T Select Games
    • Game Shark Codes
    • Letter from Betty

    Strategy

    • Resident Evil 2
    • Street Fighter EX Plus
    • Mass Destruction
    • Clay Fighter 63 1/3
    • Bushido Blade
    • Colony Wars
    • Last Bronx
    • Treasures of the Deep
    • Fighting Force
    • Clock Tower
    • Courier Crisis

    Nintendo 64 Tips

    PlayStation Tips

    Genesis Tips

    Super NES Tips

    …and more!


  • Bram Stoker’s Dracula (Sega CD)

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    Source: Mega Play – Issue Number 15 – April/May 1993

    Bram Stoker’s Dracula is a video game based on the movie of the same name that was released in 1992 (which in turn is based on the 1897 novel). The game was released in 1994 and came out on a large variety of systems. For the most part, they were all significantly different from each other. This ad highlights the Sega CD version of the game.

    All versions of the game (except the DOS version) were essentially action platform games but the level design, game play and graphics differ significantly. The Sega CD version was unique for its use of digitized backgrounds and full motion video cutscenes from the movie. The Sega CD version was only released in North America. The Amiga version did reuse some of the digitized graphics from the Sega CD version but there were more levels and they were significantly different.

    There were also regular Sega Genesis, Super Nintendo, NES, Game Boy, Game Gear, Sega Master System and DOS versions of the game. The 8-bit versions were mostly the same with the Sega Master System and Game Gear versions having slightly better graphics than the NES version and all three obviously being better than the Game Boy version. The 16-bit SNES and Genesis versions were completely different from the 8-bit versions but similar to each other except for minor differences. The last version to come along was the DOS version. This one was unique because it was more like a first persons shooter instead of a platform action/adventure game.

    With all these different variations of the game you would think at least one of them would be decent. You would be wrong. This game suffers the same fate as the vast majority of movie licenses. It is mostly crap or at best sheer mediocrity. The 8-bit versions are the worst with the Game Boy being worst of the worst. The others are probably a toss-up and depend on personal preference. If you like digitized backgrounds and characters, choppy animation and grainy, blurry FMV then go for the Sega CD version. Minus most of the FMV then go for the Amiga. More standard but below par 16-bit graphics and animation then pick the Genesis or SNES versions. Prefer first person shooter type games? Then go for the DOS version. It doesn’t really matter though as you are sure to be disappointed no matter which one you choose. I thought the movie was decent enough though.

    The ad above is from the April/May 1993 issue of Mega Play and all screen shots are from the Sega CD version of the game.


  • GamePro (July 1992)

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    Source: GamePro – July 1992

    GamePro, along with Electronic Gaming Monthly, was one of the most popular video games magazines of the late 1980s and 1990s. I never liked GamePro as much as EGM or my favorite, VideoGames & Computer Entertainment, but it was still a good magazine. The July 1992 issue includes:

      • Letter from the GamePros
      • The Mail
      • Cutting Edge – Multimedia fun and games with Commodore CDTV, Philips CD-I, and Guest by Virgin Games.
      • Hot at the Arcades – Fight evil forces throughout the video dimension with X-Men and Solvalou.
      • Special Feature: Putting the Spin on CD-ROM Systems – Here’s what’s happening with the Sega CD, the Turbo Duo, the SNES CD, and the Wondermega.
      • Team GamePro – We thank you for your support.
      • Pro Reviews
        • Nintendo: Gargoyle’s Quest II, Prince of Persia, Hillsfar, Lemmings, The Legend of the Ghost Lion, Ferrari, Grand Prix Challenge
        • Genesis: The Simpson’s: Bart vs. the Space Mutants, Evander Holyfield “Real Deal” Boxing, Todd’s Adventure in Slime World, Cyber Cop, Dragon’s Fury, Star Odyssey, Warrior of Rome II
        • Super NES: Hook, Wings 2-Aces High, Arcana, Might and Magic II, Magic Sword, Krusty’s Fun House, The Addams Family, Super Bowling
        • TurboGrafx-16: Gates of Thunder (CD)
        • Neo Geo: Previews: Last Resort, Sengoku II, King of the Monsters II
        • Game Boy: Super Hunchback, The Adventures of Star Saver, Wordtris, Pyramids of Ra, Jeep Jamboree
        • Game Gear: A special year-end preview.
        • Lynx: Hockey, Lynx Casino
      • Special Feature: Alien 3 – What’s more scary? The movie, the comic, or the Genesis video game? Check ’em all out here.
      • On Location: Accolade – Meet a new cat on the 16-bit system prowl.
      • Overseas ProSpects – From Japan: Ranma 1/2, Macross 2036, and Sega Mega CD games.
      • The Sports Page – Go to the Olympics with Gold Medal Challenge, Olympic Gold (Genesis and Game Gear), and USA Basketball.
      • Short ProShots – A quick look at some of the hottest new carts.
      • S.W.A.T.P.R.O. (Secret Weapons and Tactics) – The hottest tips and tactics from GamePros everywhere.
      • GameBusters: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles III & Contra III
    • ProNews – All the video game news that’s fit to print.

    …and more!