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  • Mass Shootings Aren’t Becoming More Common–and Evidence Contradicts Stereotypes about the Shooters


    When 22 people were killed in El Paso, Texas, and nine more were killed in Dayton, Ohio, roughly 12 hours later, responses to the tragedy included many of the same myths and stereotypes Americans have grown used to hearing in the wake of a mass shooting.

    As part of my work as a psychology researcher, I study mass homicides, as well as society’s reaction to them. A lot of bad information can follow in the wake of such emotional events; clear, data-based discussions of mass homicides can get lost among political narratives.

    I’d like to clear up four common misconceptions about mass homicides and who commits them, based on the current state of research.

    By Monday morning after these latest shootings, President Donald Trump along with other Republican politicians had linked violent video games to mass shootings.

    I’ll admit my surprise, since only last year the Trump administration convened a School Safety Commission which studied this issue, among many others. I myself testified, and the commission ultimately did not conclude there was sufficient evidence to link games and media to criminal violence.

    Long-term studies of youth consistently find that violent games are not a risk factor for youth violence anywhere from one to eight years later. And no less than the U.S. Supreme Court declared in 2011 that scientific studies had failed to link violent games to serious aggression in kids.

    A 2017 public policy statement by the American Psychological Association’s media psychology and technology division specifically recommended politicians should stop linking violent games to mass shootings. It’s time to lay this myth to rest.

    Early reports suggest that the El Paso shooter was a white racist concerned about Latino immigration. Other shooters, such as the perpetrator of the Christchurch, New Zealand, attack, have also been white supremacists.

    Overall, though, the ethnic composition of the group of all mass shooters in the U.S. is roughly equivalent to the American population.

    Hateful people tend to be attracted to hateful ideologies. Some shootings, such as the 2016 shooting of police officers in Dallas, were reportedly motivated by anti-white hatred. Other shooters, such as the 2015 San Bernardino husband and wife perpetrator team, have espoused other hateful ideas such as radical Islam.

    Most mass homicide perpetrators don’t proclaim any allegiance to a particular ideology at all.

    Of course, mass homicides in other nations—such as several deadly knife attacks in Japan—don’t involve U.S. race issues.

    As far as gender, it’s true that most mass homicide perpetrators are male. A minority of shooters are female, and they may target their own families.

    Whether mental illness is or is not related to mass shootings—or criminal vio