• Tag Archives Atari 7800
  • Double Dragon (Atari 7800)

    atarian_issue3_36

    Source: Atarian – Issue Number 3 – September/October 1989

    The hardware of the Atari 7800 was not inferior to the NES (in some ways it was better), but Atari’s decision to first delay its release and then to concentrate on yet another iteration of its various arcade classics instead of emphasizing new games doomed it. Double Dragon is one of a relative few new style games that appeared on the system and it was done by Activision.



    Atari 7800
    Double Dragon is also interesting because it appeared on both the NES and Atari 7800 (as well as the Sega Master System and various home computers). In comparing the two, there is not really a clear winner. The graphics on the NES version are, on average, somewhat better. However, the Atari 7800 version is a more faithful port of the arcade original and it allows two-player cooperative play unlike the NES version. While not the best Atari 7800 game, it does enough to prove that the 7800 was capable. There were a few games that demonstrate Atari 7800s technical capabilities better but only a few. Those that developed Atari 7800 games, particularly Atari themselves, often did so as cheaply as possible, making decisions that hurt game quality like limiting cartridge memory.



    Atari 7800
    Oddly, Activision also decided to release an Atari 2600 version of the game. This was in 1989. Though to be fair, the Atari 2600, in one form or another was sold until 1992. In addition, the Atari 7800 was backwards compatible. The Atari 2600 version of Double Dragon is surprisingly good given the limitations of that system and is interesting from a historical perspective but it can’t compare to the other versions of the game.



    Atari 2600
    If you’ve played Double Dragon on the NES or even SMS, it is still worthwhile to give the 7800 version a try. It is the most faithful to the arcade original and gives you two player cooperative play. Overall, the NES version is probably the better game but it isn’t as clear-cut as some may think. While a few Atari 7800 games have been re-released by way of the various Flashback consoles, Double Dragon is not one of them. To play this version (or the Atari 2600 version) you will have to track down an original or resort to emulation.

    The ad above is from the September/October 1989 issue of Atarian.





  • Summer Games (Epyx, 1984)

    Summer Games (Epyx, 1984)

    http://darth-azrael.tumblr.com/post/170534290331/retrocgads-usa-1985-summer-games

    The best sports game on the Commodore 64 and in my opinion in the entirety of the 8-bit era was not a baseball, basketball or football game but Epyx’s take on the olympics. Summer Games was the first in the series and coincided with the 1984 Olympic Games. While Summer Games was ultimately ported to a wide variety of video game and computer systems, it was developed first for the Commodore 64 and this is probably the most well known version. I don’t think any of the subsequent versions exceeded the Commodore 64 in terms of playability.

     

    The game starts with choosing the country you want to represent. Up to eight players can compete, two at a time. You can choose to practice an event, compete in some events, or compete in all of the events. While the available events varied depending on what version of the game you were playing, the original Commodore 64 version includes the following events: Pole Vault, Platform Diving, 4x400m Relay, 100m Dash, Gymnastics, Freestyle Relay, 100m Freestyle, and Skeet Shooting.

     

    While Summer Games is a reasonably fun game to play on your own, the real fun is competing with a group of your friends and the more the better. There is a pretty good balance of play mechanics spread throughout the vents. Some, like Pole Vault, depend on perfect timing. Putting you stick down at the right time and timing your release just right are paramount. In other events, like the 100m Dash, it’s all about how fast you can move the joystick. Each event offers its own subtleties in terms of control.

     

    Epyx went on to cre