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Re: I thought you were Dale? [message #85423 is a reply to message #85355] Mon, 17 June 2013 02:35 Go to previous messageGo to previous message
George Johnson is currently offline  George Johnson
Messages: 129
Registered: September 2012
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"Doug Elrod" <dre1@cornell.edu> wrote in message
news:5bf5f42d-9bbb-4571-903b-bd69bdcfaeb6@googlegroups.com...
> On Saturday, June 15, 2013 12:05:48 AM UTC-4, George Johnson wrote:

>> Maybe it was really Chip all along?

>>

>> Chip N Dale - Chips Ahoy - Episode 23 (Disney Cartoon)

>>

>>

>

> I just wonder if there are people out there who think that the woman might

> have been confused with DALE, as in "the town of men long-ago destroyed by

> the dragon Smaug" (as featured in the upcoming movie "The Hobbit: The

> Desolation of Smaug")!

>

> If so, we can only salute them for their dedication to all things

> Tolkien....

>

> -Doug Elrod (dre1@cornell.edu)


Well, you know what they say.
The more you know. The more interesting & annoying you are at parties.

=====

If the hills have Dales, then who is the Villain?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ville

Ville (French pronunciation: ?[vil]) is the modern French word of Latin
origin now meaning "city" or "town", but the first meaning in the
middle-ages was "farm" (from Gallo-Romance VILLA < Latin villa rustica) and
then "village". The derivative suffix -ville is commonly used in English in
names of cities, towns and villages.

Derived words
Hooverville - an area where homeless people generally lived during the
Great Depression.
Village - another loanword from French used for a settlement that was
larger than a hamlet but smaller than a town.
villain - feudal serf, peasant cultivator in subjection to a lord.
villein - the same word used by modern historians.

THE FARMER IS THE VILLAIN?
He wasn't in the Dell?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dell_%28landform%29
In physical geography, a dell is a small wooded valley. Like "dale", the
word "dell" is derived from the Old English word dæl.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dale
Locations

Dale, or dael, is an Old English word meaning valley
Dale (landform), origin of the word Dale
Dale (place name element), list of place names ending in "-dale"


http://www.houseofnames.com/dale-family-crest
The origins of the Dale name lie with England's ancient Anglo-Saxon culture.
It comes from when the family lived in the area referred to as the daleor a
valley.

Dale Early Origins

Before the last few hundred years, the English language had no fast system
of spelling rules. For that reason, spelling variations are commonly found
in early Anglo-Saxon surnames. Over the years, many variations of the name
Dale were recorded, including Dale, Daile, Dales, Dayle, Daele and others.

First found in Yorkshire where they held a family seat from very ancient
times, some say well before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke
William at Hastings in 1066 A.D.
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