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Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391166] Sat, 22 February 2020 14:20 Go to next message
hancock4 is currently offline  hancock4
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This NBC show is about a special unit of the Chicago Police.
It is part of the Mike Post family, and related to
the L&O and Chicago series.

When hunting a suspect, they use computers a lot. They
dig up fingerprints, facial recognition*, DMV files,
FBI files, military records, and bank records. It seems
they manage to get all sorts of data very quickly.

I don't know the criminal justice system, but I suspect
a lot of that stuff takes longer to dig up, especially
if a search is required.

Anyone watch the show?


*Which misidentified a suspect and resulted in his death.
Re: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391200 is a reply to message #391166] Sun, 23 February 2020 09:53 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Anonymous
Karma:
Originally posted by: JimP

On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 11:20:19 -0800 (PST), hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com wrote:
> This NBC show is about a special unit of the Chicago Police.
> It is part of the Mike Post family, and related to
> the L&O and Chicago series.
>
> When hunting a suspect, they use computers a lot. They
> dig up fingerprints, facial recognition*, DMV files,
> FBI files, military records, and bank records. It seems
> they manage to get all sorts of data very quickly.
>
> I don't know the criminal justice system, but I suspect
> a lot of that stuff takes longer to dig up, especially
> if a search is required.
>
> Anyone watch the show?
>
>
> *Which misidentified a suspect and resulted in his death.

Didn't watch that one. I did notice over the years that there were
changes in how info was obtained.

One show the cops bragged about getting fingerprints and a photo on a
criminal. They had a cylinder that was scanned at high speed and the
information sent down a telephone line. Not sure if it was a fax or
not. Probably late 1950s.

--
Jim
Re: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391201 is a reply to message #391200] Sun, 23 February 2020 10:30 Go to previous messageGo to next message
danny burstein is currently offline  danny burstein
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In <88455f9afsl9g7qus12uo9ot18e4p99i1k@4ax.com> JimP <solosam90@gmail.com> writes:

> One show the cops bragged about getting fingerprints and a photo on a
> criminal. They had a cylinder that was scanned at high speed and the
> information sent down a telephone line. Not sure if it was a fax or
> not. Probably late 1950s.

That puts them way behind Professor Pepperwinkle
in The Adventures of Superman (the one, real, and
only; accept no imitations).

In "The Phony Alibi" he develops, yes, a transporter,
which can send people over telephone wires...



--
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
dannyb@panix.com
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
Re: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391203 is a reply to message #391201] Sun, 23 February 2020 12:46 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Peter Flass is currently offline  Peter Flass
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danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> wrote:
> In <88455f9afsl9g7qus12uo9ot18e4p99i1k@4ax.com> JimP <solosam90@gmail.com> writes:
>
>> One show the cops bragged about getting fingerprints and a photo on a
>> criminal. They had a cylinder that was scanned at high speed and the
>> information sent down a telephone line. Not sure if it was a fax or
>> not. Probably late 1950s.
>
> That puts them way behind Professor Pepperwinkle
> in The Adventures of Superman (the one, real, and
> only; accept no imitations).
>
> In "The Phony Alibi" he develops, yes, a transporter,
> which can send people over telephone wires...
>

I’m looking forward to that, too, but line noise might be a problem.

--
Pete
Re: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391204 is a reply to message #391203] Sun, 23 February 2020 13:26 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Ahem A Rivet's Shot is currently offline  Ahem A Rivet's Shot
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On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 10:46:57 -0700
Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> wrote:

> danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> wrote:

>> In "The Phony Alibi" he develops, yes, a transporter,
>> which can send people over telephone wires...
>>
>
> I’m looking forward to that, too, but line noise might be a problem.

To say nothing of recordings and conference calls.

--
Steve O'Hara-Smith | Directable Mirror Arrays
C:\>WIN | A better way to focus the sun
The computer obeys and wins. | licences available see
You lose and Bill collects. | http://www.sohara.org/
Re: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391205 is a reply to message #391204] Sun, 23 February 2020 13:33 Go to previous messageGo to next message
danny burstein is currently offline  danny burstein
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In <20200223182622.086d7d68cf7b4a4bb0b9b296@eircom.net> Ahem A Rivet's Shot <steveo@eircom.net> writes:

> On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 10:46:57 -0700
> Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> wrote:

>> danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> wrote:

>>> In "The Phony Alibi" he develops, yes, a transporter,
>>> which can send people over telephone wires...
>>>
>>
>> I'm looking forward to that, too, but line noise might be a problem.

> To say nothing of recordings and conference calls.

or... [mini spoiler]:

The Bad Guys [tm] are trying to escape by dialing themselves
out to something like Alaska.

Superman races the signal over the wires, pulls the cable
pair off the telephone pole somewhere in the middle of
nowhere, holds it near the ground, and Poof, they appear...



--
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
dannyb@panix.com
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
Re: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391207 is a reply to message #391205] Sun, 23 February 2020 14:05 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Anonymous
Karma:
Originally posted by: JimP

On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 18:33:57 +0000 (UTC), danny burstein
<dannyb@panix.com> wrote:
> In <20200223182622.086d7d68cf7b4a4bb0b9b296@eircom.net> Ahem A Rivet's Shot <steveo@eircom.net> writes:
>
>> On Sun, 23 Feb 2020 10:46:57 -0700
>> Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>>> danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> wrote:
>
>>>> In "The Phony Alibi" he develops, yes, a transporter,
>>>> which can send people over telephone wires...
>>>>
>>>
>>> I'm looking forward to that, too, but line noise might be a problem.
>
>> To say nothing of recordings and conference calls.
>
> or... [mini spoiler]:
>
> The Bad Guys [tm] are trying to escape by dialing themselves
> out to something like Alaska.
>
> Superman races the signal over the wires, pulls the cable
> pair off the telephone pole somewhere in the middle of
> nowhere, holds it near the ground, and Poof, they appear...

That old 'Superman flies faster than light speed' thing.

Don't remember that episode though I do remember the one with the guy
who had a marble machine that could turn things upside down.

--
Jim
Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391208 is a reply to message #391207] Sun, 23 February 2020 14:20 Go to previous messageGo to next message
danny burstein is currently offline  danny burstein
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In <25j55fd9oio7530l0mljcfkaafos06d55n@4ax.com> JimP <solosam90@gmail.com> writes:

>>>> danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> wrote:
>>
>>>> > In "The Phony Alibi" he develops, yes, a transporter,
>>>> > which can send people over telephone wires...
>>>>
>>>> I'm looking forward to that, too, but line noise might be a problem.
>>
>>> To say nothing of recordings and conference calls.
>>
>> or... [mini spoiler]:
>>
>> The Bad Guys [tm] are trying to escape by dialing themselves
>> out to something like Alaska.
>>
>> Superman races the signal over the wires, pulls the cable
>> pair off the telephone pole somewhere in the middle of
>> nowhere, holds it near the ground, and Poof, they appear...

> That old 'Superman flies faster than light speed' thing.

Well, it's not quite that fast. While the "speed of light"
is 186k mph, more or less, that's NOT the speed at
which the actual photons, or in the case of wires,
electrons (more or less) travel.

(also, of course, the speed inside a wire is less than
in vacuum, or air...)

Think of a 100 foot long (filled) garden water hose with the
valves closed (shut).

If you open up the sprayer but keep the wall faucet closed,
nothing's going to flow (modulo some leakage..)

The second you open (turn on) the wall faucet, the water
will start spraying onto the garden.

However, the actual water leaving the wall might not get
to the outlet for 30 seconds or so.

Ditto with electrical wiring. When you start "pumping"
(term used loosely) electrons at your end, the fella
over in Alaska will immediately (more or less) see
the change. But the actual electrons (term used
very, very, loosely) are only traveling at (clickety
click, mumbo jumbo) 3 meters/second. Yeah, I was
surprised at how low that number is... [a]

[a] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_electricity




--
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
dannyb@panix.com
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
Re: Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391218 is a reply to message #391208] Sun, 23 February 2020 19:03 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Dan Espen is currently offline  Dan Espen
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Senior Member
danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> writes:

> In <25j55fd9oio7530l0mljcfkaafos06d55n@4ax.com> JimP <solosam90@gmail.com> writes:
>
>>>> > danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>> > > In "The Phony Alibi" he develops, yes, a transporter,
>>>> > > which can send people over telephone wires...
>>>> >
>>>> > I'm looking forward to that, too, but line noise might be a problem.
>>>
>>>> To say nothing of recordings and conference calls.
>>>
>>> or... [mini spoiler]:
>>>
>>> The Bad Guys [tm] are trying to escape by dialing themselves
>>> out to something like Alaska.
>>>
>>> Superman races the signal over the wires, pulls the cable
>>> pair off the telephone pole somewhere in the middle of
>>> nowhere, holds it near the ground, and Poof, they appear...
>
>> That old 'Superman flies faster than light speed' thing.
>
> Well, it's not quite that fast. While the "speed of light"
> is 186k mph, more or less, that's NOT the speed at
> which the actual photons, or in the case of wires,
> electrons (more or less) travel.
>
> (also, of course, the speed inside a wire is less than
> in vacuum, or air...)
>
> Think of a 100 foot long (filled) garden water hose with the
> valves closed (shut).
>
> If you open up the sprayer but keep the wall faucet closed,
> nothing's going to flow (modulo some leakage..)
>
> The second you open (turn on) the wall faucet, the water
> will start spraying onto the garden.
>
> However, the actual water leaving the wall might not get
> to the outlet for 30 seconds or so.

Yep, but the water starts shooting out right away.

> Ditto with electrical wiring. When you start "pumping"
> (term used loosely) electrons at your end, the fella
> over in Alaska will immediately (more or less) see
> the change. But the actual electrons (term used
> very, very, loosely) are only traveling at (clickety
> click, mumbo jumbo) 3 meters/second. Yeah, I was
> surprised at how low that number is... [a]
>
> [a] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_electricity

That's sort of misleading, looking at the movement of electrons.
As that page points out, the signal is really zipping along:

50%–99% of the speed of light,

--
Dan Espen
Re: Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391219 is a reply to message #391218] Sun, 23 February 2020 19:07 Go to previous messageGo to next message
danny burstein is currently offline  danny burstein
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In <r2v3t0$7hm$1@dont-email.me> Dan Espen <dan1espen@gmail.com> writes:

> Yep, but the water starts shooting out right away.

yabbut, not the water at the beginning (wall side)
of the hose.

Hence the people squeezing into the phone wire will
be moving pretty slowly...

However, once they get to the microwave link...

--
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
dannyb@panix.com
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
Re: Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391221 is a reply to message #391219] Sun, 23 February 2020 19:40 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Dan Espen is currently offline  Dan Espen
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danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> writes:

> In <r2v3t0$7hm$1@dont-email.me> Dan Espen <dan1espen@gmail.com>
> writes:
>
>> Yep, but the water starts shooting out right away.
>
> yabbut, not the water at the beginning (wall side) of the hose.
>
> Hence the people squeezing into the phone wire will be moving pretty
> slowly...
>
> However, once they get to the microwave link...

Well, the trick would be to send the people as a signal. Sending just
the electrons doesn't really accomplish much.

--
Dan Espen
Re: Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391227 is a reply to message #391208] Mon, 24 February 2020 01:45 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Bob Martin is currently offline  Bob Martin
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On 23 Feb 2020 at 19:20:35, danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> wrote:
> In <25j55fd9oio7530l0mljcfkaafos06d55n@4ax.com> JimP <solosam90@gmail.com> writes:
>
>>>> > danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>> > > In "The Phony Alibi" he develops, yes, a transporter,
>>>> > > which can send people over telephone wires...
>>>> >
>>>> > I'm looking forward to that, too, but line noise might be a problem.
>>>
>>>> To say nothing of recordings and conference calls.
>>>
>>> or... [mini spoiler]:
>>>
>>> The Bad Guys [tm] are trying to escape by dialing themselves
>>> out to something like Alaska.
>>>
>>> Superman races the signal over the wires, pulls the cable
>>> pair off the telephone pole somewhere in the middle of
>>> nowhere, holds it near the ground, and Poof, they appear...
>
>> That old 'Superman flies faster than light speed' thing.
>
> Well, it's not quite that fast. While the "speed of light"
> is 186k mph, more or less, that's NOT the speed at

186k miles per *second*

> which the actual photons, or in the case of wires,
> electrons (more or less) travel.
>
> (also, of course, the speed inside a wire is less than
> in vacuum, or air...)
>
> Think of a 100 foot long (filled) garden water hose with the
> valves closed (shut).
>
> If you open up the sprayer but keep the wall faucet closed,
> nothing's going to flow (modulo some leakage..)
>
> The second you open (turn on) the wall faucet, the water
> will start spraying onto the garden.
>
> However, the actual water leaving the wall might not get
> to the outlet for 30 seconds or so.
>
> Ditto with electrical wiring. When you start "pumping"
> (term used loosely) electrons at your end, the fella
> over in Alaska will immediately (more or less) see
> the change. But the actual electrons (term used
> very, very, loosely) are only traveling at (clickety
> click, mumbo jumbo) 3 meters/second. Yeah, I was
> surprised at how low that number is... [a]
>
> [a] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speed_of_electricity
>
>
>
>
> --
> _____________________________________________________
> Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
> dannyb@panix.com
> [to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
Re: Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391228 is a reply to message #391227] Mon, 24 February 2020 01:47 Go to previous messageGo to next message
danny burstein is currently offline  danny burstein
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In <hbh9oaFl9jpU1@mid.individual.net> Bob Martin <bob.martin@excite.com> writes:

>>>> >> danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> wrote:
>>>>
[snipppppp]

>>> That old 'Superman flies faster than light speed' thing.
>>
>> Well, it's not quite that fast. While the "speed of light"
>> is 186k mph, more or less, that's NOT the speed at

> 186k miles per *second*

Ouch, double ouch. You're of course absolutely right.

Thwack. Slap. Crunch!


--
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
dannyb@panix.com
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
Re: Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391230 is a reply to message #391208] Mon, 24 February 2020 11:45 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Peter Flass is currently offline  Peter Flass
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Andreas Kohlbach <ank@spamfence.net> wrote:
> On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 06:47:52 +0000 (UTC), danny burstein wrote:
>>
>> In <hbh9oaFl9jpU1@mid.individual.net> Bob Martin <bob.martin@excite.com> writes:
>>
>>>> >>>> danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> wrote:
>>>> >>
>> [snipppppp]
>>
>>>> > That old 'Superman flies faster than light speed' thing.
>>>>
>>>> Well, it's not quite that fast. While the "speed of light"
>>>> is 186k mph, more or less, that's NOT the speed at
>>
>>> 186k miles per *second*
>>
>> Ouch, double ouch. You're of course absolutely right.
>>
>> Thwack. Slap. Crunch!
>
> Damn, use metric in both cases. ;-)
>
> 300 million meters per second. Easier to remember.

Not really, when you’ve learned 186,000 miles/sec. Metric is overrated ;-)

--
Pete
Re: Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391231 is a reply to message #391230] Mon, 24 February 2020 12:04 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Anonymous
Karma:
Originally posted by: nobody

On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 09:45:20 -0700, Peter Flass
<peter_flass@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Andreas Kohlbach <ank@spamfence.net> wrote:
>> 300 million meters per second. Easier to remember.
>
> Not really, when you’ve learned 186,000 miles/sec. Metric is overrated ;-)

Metric has its uses, but there's nothing magical about it. Mostly
anyone who crows about its decimal nature just hasn't thought about it
enough (the Babylonians were right). I've spent my life in the USA so
I'm comfortable with Imperial, but my time has overlapped with the
time of internationalization, so I'm (nearly) equally comfortable with
metric. Both share the disadvantage of being invented by humans trying
to impose some kind of order on a natural world that simply refuses to
cooperate.
Re: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391235 is a reply to message #391200] Mon, 24 February 2020 14:42 Go to previous messageGo to next message
hancock4 is currently offline  hancock4
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On Sunday, February 23, 2020 at 9:54:41 AM UTC-5, JimP wrote:
> On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 11:20:19 -0800 (PST), hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com wrote:
>> This NBC show is about a special unit of the Chicago Police.
>> It is part of the Mike Post family, and related to
>> the L&O and Chicago series.
>>
>> When hunting a suspect, they use computers a lot. They
>> dig up fingerprints, facial recognition*, DMV files,
>> FBI files, military records, and bank records. It seems
>> they manage to get all sorts of data very quickly.
>>
>> I don't know the criminal justice system, but I suspect
>> a lot of that stuff takes longer to dig up, especially
>> if a search is required.
>>
>> Anyone watch the show?
>>
>>
>> *Which misidentified a suspect and resulted in his death.
>
> Didn't watch that one. I did notice over the years that there were
> changes in how info was obtained.
>
> One show the cops bragged about getting fingerprints and a photo on a
> criminal. They had a cylinder that was scanned at high speed and the
> information sent down a telephone line. Not sure if it was a fax or
> not. Probably late 1950s.

Here's a Wikipedia on wirephotos
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wirephoto

It was big for newspapers and law enforcement years ago.
Both AT&T and Western Union offered transmission.
Re: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391236 is a reply to message #391203] Mon, 24 February 2020 14:47 Go to previous messageGo to next message
hancock4 is currently offline  hancock4
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On Sunday, February 23, 2020 at 12:46:58 PM UTC-5, Peter Flass wrote:

>> In "The Phony Alibi" he develops, yes, a transporter,
>> which can send people over telephone wires...
>>
>
> I’m looking forward to that, too, but line noise might be a problem.

And in the 1950s, the long distance toll charges would be steep.
Perry White would not approve.

Side note: the actor who played Perry White also was on
the Maltese Falcon as an official, giving Bogart a hard
time. Only time I ever saw him on anything else.

Also, interesting how the TV show reflected the 1950s.
Superman protected "truth, justice, and The American Way!".
Never did quite understand exactly what "The American Way"
was, but it sounded impressive.
Re: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391237 is a reply to message #391201] Mon, 24 February 2020 14:52 Go to previous messageGo to next message
hancock4 is currently offline  hancock4
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On Sunday, February 23, 2020 at 10:30:28 AM UTC-5, danny burstein wrote:

> That puts them way behind Professor Pepperwinkle
> in The Adventures of Superman (the one, real, and
> only; accept no imitations).

I liked the TV show as a kid, but more recently in
reruns didn't care for it as much. Too campy, too
unbelievable. Lois Lane and Jimmy Olsen were always
doing stupid things that put themselves in danger.
They never caught on to Clark always disappearing
yet getting the story first.

I like Highway Patrol, but we lost the local outlet
of that rerun network.

I don't think we get Superman anywhere now. MeTV
is always tinkering with its schedule.

Did Professor Pepperwinkle, or anyone else, ever
use a computer or punched device?
Re: Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391238 is a reply to message #391231] Mon, 24 February 2020 14:56 Go to previous messageGo to next message
hancock4 is currently offline  hancock4
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On Monday, February 24, 2020 at 12:04:18 PM UTC-5, Scott wrote:

>> Not really, when you’ve learned 186,000 miles/sec. Metric is overrated ;-)
>
> Metric has its uses, but there's nothing magical about it. Mostly
> anyone who crows about its decimal nature just hasn't thought about it
> enough (the Babylonians were right). I've spent my life in the USA so
> I'm comfortable with Imperial, but my time has overlapped with the
> time of internationalization, so I'm (nearly) equally comfortable with
> metric. Both share the disadvantage of being invented by humans trying
> to impose some kind of order on a natural world that simply refuses to
> cooperate.

I never understood why time wasn't converted to metric. Would've
been so much easier to have a ten hour day than 24, as well
as decimal sub units.

Also, I never understood the point of centrigrade. Temperature
doesn't get converted to different units, so what is the
advantage of having freezing and boiling at 0 and 100?


Our time clocks recorded the minutes in decimal which made it
easier to calculate.

Burroughs made adding machines which could use a variety of
fractions.
Re: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391240 is a reply to message #391236] Mon, 24 February 2020 15:01 Go to previous messageGo to next message
danny burstein is currently offline  danny burstein
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In <2a236a4c-1043-4929-abc3-cc305ee54da3@googlegroups.com> hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com writes:

> On Sunday, February 23, 2020 at 12:46:58 PM UTC-5, Peter Flass wrote:

>>> In "The Phony Alibi" he develops, yes, a transporter,
>>> which can send people over telephone wires...
>>> =20
>> =20
>> I=E2=80=99m looking forward to that, too, but line noise might be a probl=
> em.

> And in the 1950s, the long distance toll charges would be steep.
> Perry White would not approve.

> Side note: the actor who played Perry White also was on
> the Maltese Falcon as an official, giving Bogart a hard
> time. Only time I ever saw him on anything else.

He was one of the industrialists who were at that Big Meeting
where the Feds called all the Captains of Industry together
during The Great Patriotic War and ask them for help
in building an atomic bomb. Documented in the movie
"The Beginning or the End".

Aside from some obligatory Hollywood love stories and
jingoism, it's a pretty good representation of what
went on.




--
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
dannyb@panix.com
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
Re: Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391246 is a reply to message #391238] Mon, 24 February 2020 15:05 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Ahem A Rivet's Shot is currently offline  Ahem A Rivet's Shot
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On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 11:56:26 -0800 (PST)
hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com wrote:

> Also, I never understood the point of centrigrade. Temperature
> doesn't get converted to different units, so what is the
> advantage of having freezing and boiling at 0 and 100?

A lot more reproducible than 0 is the freezing point of sea water
and 100 is blood temperature.

--
Steve O'Hara-Smith | Directable Mirror Arrays
C:\>WIN | A better way to focus the sun
The computer obeys and wins. | licences available see
You lose and Bill collects. | http://www.sohara.org/
Re: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391247 is a reply to message #391240] Mon, 24 February 2020 15:38 Go to previous messageGo to next message
hancock4 is currently offline  hancock4
Messages: 6561
Registered: December 2011
Karma: 0
Senior Member
On Monday, February 24, 2020 at 3:01:08 PM UTC-5, danny burstein wrote:
> In <2a236a4c-1043-4929-abc3-cc305ee54da3@googlegroups.com> hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com writes:
>
>> On Sunday, February 23, 2020 at 12:46:58 PM UTC-5, Peter Flass wrote:
>
>>>> In "The Phony Alibi" he develops, yes, a transporter,
>>>> which can send people over telephone wires...
>>>> =20
>>> =20
>>> I=E2=80=99m looking forward to that, too, but line noise might be a probl=
>> em.
>
>> And in the 1950s, the long distance toll charges would be steep.
>> Perry White would not approve.
>
>> Side note: the actor who played Perry White also was on
>> the Maltese Falcon as an official, giving Bogart a hard
>> time. Only time I ever saw him on anything else.
>
> He was one of the industrialists who were at that Big Meeting
> where the Feds called all the Captains of Industry together
> during The Great Patriotic War and ask them for help
> in building an atomic bomb. Documented in the movie
> "The Beginning or the End".
>
> Aside from some obligatory Hollywood love stories and
> jingoism, it's a pretty good representation of what
> went on.

That particular movie had an awful lot of Hollywood jingoism,
too much, IMHO.

Indeed, in my opinion, most representations of the Manhattan
Project were lousy. In reality, it was a lot of prodding
tedious hard work and tremendous personal sacrifice. Given
the oppressive atmosphere imposed on everyone, I'm surprised
they actually succeeded.

Gen. Groves managed to piss off so many people that his military
career was ruined after the war. He was lucky Remington
Rand picked him up. As best as I can tell, it was a
make-work ceremonial job with a nice salary and a house
in Connecticut.

As an aside, I saw a new book on the history of espionage.
It listed several Russian spies that previously were kept secret.

There was a recent TV show on this, but I thought it was lousy.

I still feel sad about the two scientists who died _after_ the
war experimenting with radiation. Since the war was over, there
was no need to take that kind of a risk*.

I think a good writer could do an "Inside Box 1663" that
would honestly reflect what went on in Hanford, Los Alamos,
Oak Ridge, and elsewhere.


* I also still wonder if the hundreds of thousands of
scientists and production workers of the Project suffered
ill effects from radiation exposure, likewise their descendants.
I know a few key scientists, like Fermi, died relatively young
from unusual cancers. But back then and for years after,
industrial America was full of dangerous stuff on the job
and in the air and water, and no one knew.
Re: Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391256 is a reply to message #391238] Mon, 24 February 2020 16:14 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Peter Flass is currently offline  Peter Flass
Messages: 7418
Registered: December 2011
Karma: 0
Senior Member
<hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com> wrote:
> On Monday, February 24, 2020 at 12:04:18 PM UTC-5, Scott wrote:
>
>>> Not really, when you’ve learned 186,000 miles/sec. Metric is overrated ;-)
>>
>> Metric has its uses, but there's nothing magical about it. Mostly
>> anyone who crows about its decimal nature just hasn't thought about it
>> enough (the Babylonians were right). I've spent my life in the USA so
>> I'm comfortable with Imperial, but my time has overlapped with the
>> time of internationalization, so I'm (nearly) equally comfortable with
>> metric. Both share the disadvantage of being invented by humans trying
>> to impose some kind of order on a natural world that simply refuses to
>> cooperate.
>
> I never understood why time wasn't converted to metric. Would've
> been so much easier to have a ten hour day than 24, as well
> as decimal sub units.
>
> Also, I never understood the point of centrigrade. Temperature
> doesn't get converted to different units, so what is the
> advantage of having freezing and boiling at 0 and 100?

Why not 100 degrees in a circle?

--
Pete
Manhattan District, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391262 is a reply to message #391247] Mon, 24 February 2020 17:34 Go to previous messageGo to next message
danny burstein is currently offline  danny burstein
Messages: 60
Registered: October 2012
Karma: 0
Member
In <b240f6b4-eb78-41eb-86af-3c3a62e6ea01@googlegroups.com> hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com writes:
[snip]

>>> Side note: the actor who played Perry White also was on
>>> the Maltese Falcon as an official, giving Bogart a hard
>>> time. Only time I ever saw him on anything else.
>>
>> He was one of the industrialists who were at that Big Meeting
>> where the Feds called all the Captains of Industry together
>> during The Great Patriotic War and ask them for help
>> in building an atomic bomb. Documented in the movie
>> "The Beginning or the End".
>>
>> Aside from some obligatory Hollywood love stories and
>> jingoism, it's a pretty good representation of what
>> went on.

> That particular movie had an awful lot of Hollywood jingoism,
> too much, IMHO.

> Indeed, in my opinion, most representations of the Manhattan
> Project were lousy. In reality, it was a lot of prodding
> tedious hard work and tremendous personal sacrifice. Given
> the oppressive atmosphere imposed on everyone, I'm surprised
> they actually succeeded.

> Gen. Groves managed to piss off so many people that his military
> career was ruined after the war. He was lucky Remington
> Rand picked him up. As best as I can tell, it was a
> make-work ceremonial job with a nice salary and a house
> in Connecticut.

> As an aside, I saw a new book on the history of espionage.
> It listed several Russian spies that previously were kept secret.

> There was a recent TV show on this, but I thought it was lousy.

Are you referring to
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manhattan_(TV_series) ?

Hey, it had Rachel Brosnahan and (clickety click) Katja Herbers!

> * I also still wonder if the hundreds of thousands of
> scientists and production workers of the Project suffered
> ill effects from radiation exposure, likewise their descendants.
> I know a few key scientists, like Fermi, died relatively young
> from unusual cancers. But back then and for years after,
> industrial America was full of dangerous stuff on the job
> and in the air and water, and no one knew.

Something you'd appreciate (seriously), and that I wish
could be documented:

Back in 1965 I took a tour of Kodak Park, Rochester, and they
showed us the photographic film manufacturing area.

(Remember Back In The Day when.. companies would show
off their production lines?)

So we're in a very dim hallway, overlooking a large
factory floor, that has just barely visible marker lighting
for minimal safety 'cuz film, of course, is light sensitive.

The guide explains that part, of course, and also describes
the super clean environment they need. He added that they
had Geiger Counters on the air vents, and that if they
detected any radiation from the Nevada tests (remember
back then these were often open air) they'd route the
air through extra filters to keep the fallout away from
the film.

Eyup. Worried about the film. Not about the people...

Kind of like Flint. GM noticed that the bad water
was corroding their engine parts, so they ran a new
pipeline to bring in Detroit water.

But no one cared about the people.

(Until Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, of course).



--
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
dannyb@panix.com
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
Re: Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391263 is a reply to message #391238] Mon, 24 February 2020 17:39 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Gerard Schildberger is currently offline  Gerard Schildberger
Messages: 153
Registered: September 2012
Karma: 0
Senior Member
On Monday, February 24, 2020 at 1:56:27 PM UTC-6, hanc wrote:
> On Monday, February 24, 2020 at 12:04:18 PM UTC-5, Scott wrote:
>
>>> Not really, when you’ve learned 186,000 miles/sec. Metric is overrated ;-)
>>
>> Metric has its uses, but there's nothing magical about it. Mostly
>> anyone who crows about its decimal nature just hasn't thought about it
>> enough (the Babylonians were right). I've spent my life in the USA so
>> I'm comfortable with Imperial, but my time has overlapped with the
>> time of internationalization, so I'm (nearly) equally comfortable with
>> metric. Both share the disadvantage of being invented by humans trying
>> to impose some kind of order on a natural world that simply refuses to
>> cooperate.
>
> I never understood why time wasn't converted to metric. Would've
> been so much easier to have a ten hour day than 24, as well
> as decimal sub units.

Time was converted to decimal (which might be thought as metric) during
(or just after) the French Revolution (in the start of 1792). A day was
divided into ten decimal hours, each decimal hour into one hundred
decimal minutes, and each decimal minute into 100 decimal seconds.

There were 100,000 decimal seconds per day. It was NOT very
popular with the citizens. I think it lasted about five years before
its use was dropped.

> Also, I never understood the point of centrigrade. Temperature
> doesn't get converted to different units, so what is the
> advantage of having freezing and boiling at 0 and 100?

Temperature gets converted all time time (to different scales).
Celsius <--> to Fahrenheit <--> Rankine <--> absolute <--> kelvin
and a host of others. Not all temperature scales are in degrees.

Celsius (old name was centigrade, but was renamed because centigrade
was used in measuring angles --- 1/100 of a grad, 400 grads (or
gradians to a unit circle), so the-powers-that-be rename degrees
centigrade to degrees Celsius. I learned degrees centigrade in grade
school and high school. By the time I got to college, it was degrees
Celsius. ... Yeah, I'm almost older than dirt.

I have written a computer program to convert all the different types
of temperature scales (that is, all those temperature scales that
I could find, who knows how many have been lost to history and disuse):

absolute
Amonton
Barnsdorf
Beaumuir
Benart
Bergen
Brissen
Celsius
Cimento
Cruquius
Dalence
Dalton
Daniell
de la Hire
de la Ville
Delisle
Delisle old
de Luc
de Lyon
de Revillas
Derham
Derham old
de Suede
De Villeneuve
Du Crest
Edinburgh
electron-volts
Fahrenheit
Fahrenheit old
Florentine large
Florentine magnum
Florentine small
Fowler
Frick
gasmark
Goubert
Hales
Hanow
Hauksbee
Jacobs-Holborn
kelvin
Leiden
Newton
Oertel
Planck
Rankine
Reaumur
Richter
Rinaldini
Romer Rømer Roemer
Rosenthal
Royal Society
Sagredo
Saint-Patrice
Stufe
Sulzer
thermostat
Wedgwood


Note that some of the above temperature scales can be spelt with
diacritical marks.) There are also alternative spellings for quite
a few temperature scales.


Note that Lord Kelvin's name is NOT capitalized when referring to degrees
kelvin. I am not certain about the various capitalizations (or not cap)
for some of the de and du names.
____________________________________________ Gerard Schildberger


> Our time clocks recorded the minutes in decimal which made it
> easier to calculate.
>
> Burroughs made adding machines which could use a variety of
> fractions.
Re: Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391264 is a reply to message #391263] Mon, 24 February 2020 18:11 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Charlie Gibbs is currently offline  Charlie Gibbs
Messages: 4668
Registered: January 2012
Karma: 0
Senior Member
On 2020-02-24, Gerard Schildberger <gerard46@rrt.net> wrote:

[a truly amazing list of temperature scales]

> Note that Lord Kelvin's name is NOT capitalized when referring to degrees
> kelvin.

<nit>
Also, it's not "degrees kelvin" but simply "kelvin".
</nit>

--
/~\ Charlie Gibbs | Microsoft is a dictatorship.
\ / <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> | Apple is a cult.
X I'm really at ac.dekanfrus | Linux is anarchy.
/ \ if you read it the right way. | Pick your poison.
Re: Manhattan District, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391271 is a reply to message #391262] Mon, 24 February 2020 19:35 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Peter Flass is currently offline  Peter Flass
Messages: 7418
Registered: December 2011
Karma: 0
Senior Member
danny burstein <dannyb@panix.com> wrote:
> In <b240f6b4-eb78-41eb-86af-3c3a62e6ea01@googlegroups.com> hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com writes:
> [snip]
>
>>>> Side note: the actor who played Perry White also was on
>>>> the Maltese Falcon as an official, giving Bogart a hard
>>>> time. Only time I ever saw him on anything else.
>>>
>>> He was one of the industrialists who were at that Big Meeting
>>> where the Feds called all the Captains of Industry together
>>> during The Great Patriotic War and ask them for help
>>> in building an atomic bomb. Documented in the movie
>>> "The Beginning or the End".
>>>
>>> Aside from some obligatory Hollywood love stories and
>>> jingoism, it's a pretty good representation of what
>>> went on.
>
>> That particular movie had an awful lot of Hollywood jingoism,
>> too much, IMHO.
>
>> Indeed, in my opinion, most representations of the Manhattan
>> Project were lousy. In reality, it was a lot of prodding
>> tedious hard work and tremendous personal sacrifice. Given
>> the oppressive atmosphere imposed on everyone, I'm surprised
>> they actually succeeded.
>
>> Gen. Groves managed to piss off so many people that his military
>> career was ruined after the war. He was lucky Remington
>> Rand picked him up. As best as I can tell, it was a
>> make-work ceremonial job with a nice salary and a house
>> in Connecticut.
>
>> As an aside, I saw a new book on the history of espionage.
>> It listed several Russian spies that previously were kept secret.
>
>> There was a recent TV show on this, but I thought it was lousy.
>
> Are you referring to
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manhattan_(TV_series) ?
>
> Hey, it had Rachel Brosnahan and (clickety click) Katja Herbers!
>
>> * I also still wonder if the hundreds of thousands of
>> scientists and production workers of the Project suffered
>> ill effects from radiation exposure, likewise their descendants.
>> I know a few key scientists, like Fermi, died relatively young
>> from unusual cancers. But back then and for years after,
>> industrial America was full of dangerous stuff on the job
>> and in the air and water, and no one knew.
>
> Something you'd appreciate (seriously), and that I wish
> could be documented:
>
> Back in 1965 I took a tour of Kodak Park, Rochester, and they
> showed us the photographic film manufacturing area.
>
> (Remember Back In The Day when.. companies would show
> off their production lines?)
>
> So we're in a very dim hallway, overlooking a large
> factory floor, that has just barely visible marker lighting
> for minimal safety 'cuz film, of course, is light sensitive.

These days, of course, someone would pull out his phone and take a picture
— oops, there hoes another batch of film.

>
> The guide explains that part, of course, and also describes
> the super clean environment they need. He added that they
> had Geiger Counters on the air vents, and that if they
> detected any radiation from the Nevada tests (remember
> back then these were often open air) they'd route the
> air through extra filters to keep the fallout away from
> the film.
>
> Eyup. Worried about the film. Not about the people...
>
> Kind of like Flint. GM noticed that the bad water
> was corroding their engine parts, so they ran a new
> pipeline to bring in Detroit water.
>
> But no one cared about the people.
>
> (Until Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, of course).
>
>
>



--
Pete
Re: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391277 is a reply to message #391235] Tue, 25 February 2020 10:09 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Anonymous
Karma:
Originally posted by: JimP

On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 11:42:03 -0800 (PST), hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com wrote:
> On Sunday, February 23, 2020 at 9:54:41 AM UTC-5, JimP wrote:
>> On Sat, 22 Feb 2020 11:20:19 -0800 (PST), hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com wrote:
>>> This NBC show is about a special unit of the Chicago Police.
>>> It is part of the Mike Post family, and related to
>>> the L&O and Chicago series.
>>>
>>> When hunting a suspect, they use computers a lot. They
>>> dig up fingerprints, facial recognition*, DMV files,
>>> FBI files, military records, and bank records. It seems
>>> they manage to get all sorts of data very quickly.
>>>
>>> I don't know the criminal justice system, but I suspect
>>> a lot of that stuff takes longer to dig up, especially
>>> if a search is required.
>>>
>>> Anyone watch the show?
>>>
>>>
>>> *Which misidentified a suspect and resulted in his death.
>>
>> Didn't watch that one. I did notice over the years that there were
>> changes in how info was obtained.
>>
>> One show the cops bragged about getting fingerprints and a photo on a
>> criminal. They had a cylinder that was scanned at high speed and the
>> information sent down a telephone line. Not sure if it was a fax or
>> not. Probably late 1950s.
>
> Here's a Wikipedia on wirephotos
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wirephoto
>
> It was big for newspapers and law enforcement years ago.
> Both AT&T and Western Union offered transmission.

Yeah, wirephotos. Apparently helped catch a few criminals.

--
Jim
Re: Manhattan District, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391300 is a reply to message #391262] Wed, 26 February 2020 14:34 Go to previous messageGo to next message
hancock4 is currently offline  hancock4
Messages: 6561
Registered: December 2011
Karma: 0
Senior Member
On Monday, February 24, 2020 at 5:34:24 PM UTC-5, danny burstein wrote:

> Back in 1965 I took a tour of Kodak Park, Rochester, and they
> showed us the photographic film manufacturing area.
>
> (Remember Back In The Day when.. companies would show
> off their production lines?)

Yes, those tours were fascinating. Even got free samples
(like a free loaf of bread after a tour of the commercial
bakery). Companies were proud of themselves and had
whole units of tourguides and literature.




>
> So we're in a very dim hallway, overlooking a large
> factory floor, that has just barely visible marker lighting
> for minimal safety 'cuz film, of course, is light sensitive.
>
> The guide explains that part, of course, and also describes
> the super clean environment they need. He added that they
> had Geiger Counters on the air vents, and that if they
> detected any radiation from the Nevada tests (remember
> back then these were often open air) they'd route the
> air through extra filters to keep the fallout away from
> the film.
>
> Eyup. Worried about the film. Not about the people...

Yep. A 1950s text on steel making spends time addressing
the corrosive atmosphere around a steel plant. Here too,
not worried about the effect on the workers, but rather
the impact on steels that had a special surface finish
to them--they didn't want them getting pitted or marred
from atmospheric corrosion.

Other texts talk about impact on electrical devices.
Sometimes crap in the air would react would surface
materials and cause electrical or electronic issues.




> Kind of like Flint. GM noticed that the bad water
> was corroding their engine parts, so they ran a new
> pipeline to bring in Detroit water.
> But no one cared about the people.
> (Until Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, of course).


A steel plant was dumping nasty scaling acid in the river
which caused problems downstream. Even in the limited
standards of the past it was still a violation. But
the steel company just ignored letters from the health
department.

This was common in the US steel industry. When the EPA
was created in the 1970s and got some teeth, the steel
industry finally was forced to address some of its
worst pollution abuses. In some cases the cost was too
much to clean up an old plant so it closed down.

I have mixed feelings about that. On the one hand, I
don't like to see jobs and industry shut down. But on
the other hand, some of the pollution was very nasty--we
don't want nasty acid in our drinking water, or air do
dirty and corrosive it ruins our car finishes.

One tough issue is that while the US cleaned itself
up quite a bit from 50 years ago, part of the solution
meant simply offshoring the mess. That is, poor
countries elsewhere in the world now do our dirty
work, poisoning themselves. Out of sight out of mind.
Re: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391301 is a reply to message #391277] Wed, 26 February 2020 14:38 Go to previous messageGo to next message
hancock4 is currently offline  hancock4
Messages: 6561
Registered: December 2011
Karma: 0
Senior Member
On Tuesday, February 25, 2020 at 10:10:42 AM UTC-5, JimP wrote:

>> It was big for newspapers and law enforcement years ago.
>> Both AT&T and Western Union offered transmission.
>
> Yeah, wirephotos. Apparently helped catch a few criminals.


see
https://books.google.com/books?id=jUMEAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA36& amp;dq=bell%20telephone%20wire%20photo&pg=PA36#v=onepage &q&f=false

and

https://books.google.com/books?id=CgQU09UDVaIC&lpg=PA51& amp;dq=bell%20telephone%20wire%20photo&pg=PA51#v=onepage &q&f=false
Re: Manhattan District, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391318 is a reply to message #391262] Thu, 27 February 2020 15:05 Go to previous messageGo to next message
hancock4 is currently offline  hancock4
Messages: 6561
Registered: December 2011
Karma: 0
Senior Member
On Monday, February 24, 2020 at 5:34:24 PM UTC-5, danny burstein wrote:

> The guide explains that part, of course, and also describes
> the super clean environment they need. He added that they
> had Geiger Counters on the air vents, and that if they
> detected any radiation from the Nevada tests (remember
> back then these were often open air) they'd route the
> air through extra filters to keep the fallout away from
> the film.
>
> Eyup. Worried about the film. Not about the people...

Here's a 1956 technical article on the effects of
corrosion on electrical units.
http://massis.lcs.mit.edu/telecom-archives/archives/technica l/western-union-tech-review/10-2/p052.htm

Funny thing: apparently air at the seashore is rough on things
because of the salt content. But my parents used to say
that salt air was healthy, they liked visiting the seashore
for that reason (indeed, hoped to retire there).
Re: Manhattan District, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391343 is a reply to message #391318] Fri, 28 February 2020 09:48 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Anonymous
Karma:
Originally posted by: JimP

On Thu, 27 Feb 2020 12:05:08 -0800 (PST), hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com wrote:
> On Monday, February 24, 2020 at 5:34:24 PM UTC-5, danny burstein wrote:
>
>> The guide explains that part, of course, and also describes
>> the super clean environment they need. He added that they
>> had Geiger Counters on the air vents, and that if they
>> detected any radiation from the Nevada tests (remember
>> back then these were often open air) they'd route the
>> air through extra filters to keep the fallout away from
>> the film.
>>
>> Eyup. Worried about the film. Not about the people...
>
> Here's a 1956 technical article on the effects of
> corrosion on electrical units.
> http://massis.lcs.mit.edu/telecom-archives/archives/technica l/western-union-tech-review/10-2/p052.htm
>
> Funny thing: apparently air at the seashore is rough on things
> because of the salt content. But my parents used to say
> that salt air was healthy, they liked visiting the seashore
> for that reason (indeed, hoped to retire there).

When I got aboard ship, a DDG, I was told to forget what I had learned
in electronics tech school because aboard ship there were major
differences due to salt water corrosion.

--
Jim
Re: Manhattan District, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391348 is a reply to message #391343] Fri, 28 February 2020 15:30 Go to previous messageGo to next message
hancock4 is currently offline  hancock4
Messages: 6561
Registered: December 2011
Karma: 0
Senior Member
On Friday, February 28, 2020 at 9:50:09 AM UTC-5, JimP wrote:

> When I got aboard ship, a DDG, I was told to forget what I had learned
> in electronics tech school because aboard ship there were major
> differences due to salt water corrosion.

Did the motion of the ship impact the operation of electrical
and electronic equipment?

I had a tour of a Coast Guard ship tied up at dock. It still
had some vertical movement even at rest.
Re: Manhattan District, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391350 is a reply to message #391348] Fri, 28 February 2020 18:57 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Anonymous
Karma:
Originally posted by: JimP

On Fri, 28 Feb 2020 12:30:30 -0800 (PST), hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com wrote:
> On Friday, February 28, 2020 at 9:50:09 AM UTC-5, JimP wrote:
>
>> When I got aboard ship, a DDG, I was told to forget what I had learned
>> in electronics tech school because aboard ship there were major
>> differences due to salt water corrosion.
>
> Did the motion of the ship impact the operation of electrical
> and electronic equipment?

Some items it did. Our guns if fired in a specific direction would pop
relays in certain gear, shutting them off.

The big problem was the salt air.

> I had a tour of a Coast Guard ship tied up at dock. It still
> had some vertical movement even at rest.

The DDG I was on bobbled around a bit when a tug boat, etc. went by in
the channel not far away.

One year there was a DDER, a destroyer escort radar picket ship, tied
up on the other side of the pier. A tug went by in the channel. We
bobbled a bit. They bounced around like a storm at sea, bounced off
the pier, they had to hang on for dear life to stay upright and not
get tossed off their ship.

We asked them if they were okay, and they said that was nothing. It
was bad out on the ocean. We just looked at each other and decided the
ship we were stationed on wasn't so bad afterall.

--
Jim
Re: Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391448 is a reply to message #391231] Wed, 04 March 2020 09:30 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Anonymous
Karma:
Originally posted by: Thomas Koenig

Scott <nobody@example.org> schrieb:
> On Mon, 24 Feb 2020 09:45:20 -0700, Peter Flass
> <peter_flass@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> Andreas Kohlbach <ank@spamfence.net> wrote:
>>> 300 million meters per second. Easier to remember.
>>
>> Not really, when you’ve learned 186,000 miles/sec. Metric is overrated ;-)
>
> Metric has its uses, but there's nothing magical about it.

I remember standing in a chemical plant in the US. The people
had conversion tables for units of volume on a note on the wall.

Why?

Well, the tanks they had were rated in cubic foot, and the
pumps were rated in gallons per minute.

Now, assume you have a 1000 cubic foot tank which you empty with 5
gallons per minute, that gives you how many hours before the tank
is empty?
Re: Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391449 is a reply to message #391256] Wed, 04 March 2020 09:33 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Anonymous
Karma:
Originally posted by: Thomas Koenig

Peter Flass <peter_flass@yahoo.com> schrieb:

> Why not 100 degrees in a circle?

There is the "gon" (400 degrees to the circle).
Of course, artillery uses 6400 mils, which gives
you roughly 1 m per 1000 m (so, 2*pi + 6.4).
Re: Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391451 is a reply to message #391448] Wed, 04 March 2020 10:25 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Ahem A Rivet's Shot is currently offline  Ahem A Rivet's Shot
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On Wed, 4 Mar 2020 14:30:56 -0000 (UTC)
Thomas Koenig <tkoenig@netcologne.de> wrote:

> I remember standing in a chemical plant in the US. The people
> had conversion tables for units of volume on a note on the wall.
>
> Why?
>
> Well, the tanks they had were rated in cubic foot, and the
> pumps were rated in gallons per minute.

and might have been imported from the UK just to add to the fun.

> Now, assume you have a 1000 cubic foot tank which you empty with 5
> gallons per minute, that gives you how many hours before the tank
> is empty?

First check the 'made in' label on the pumps, then swear loudly
when it said "China" and look carefully in the specs to find out which
gallons were meant.

--
Steve O'Hara-Smith | Directable Mirror Arrays
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Re: Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391452 is a reply to message #391448] Wed, 04 March 2020 11:40 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Anonymous
Karma:
Originally posted by: nobody

On Wed, 4 Mar 2020 14:30:56 -0000 (UTC), Thomas Koenig
<tkoenig@netcologne.de> wrote:

> Scott <nobody@example.org> schrieb:
>> Metric has its uses, but there's nothing magical about it.
>
> I remember standing in a chemical plant in the US. The people
> had conversion tables for units of volume on a note on the wall.
>
> Why?
>
> Well, the tanks they had were rated in cubic foot, and the
> pumps were rated in gallons per minute.
>
> Now, assume you have a 1000 cubic foot tank which you empty with 5
> gallons per minute, that gives you how many hours before the tank
> is empty?

Would it be easier to talk about moving 28,315 liters at 18.9 LPM?
Re: Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391455 is a reply to message #391452] Wed, 04 March 2020 12:51 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Ahem A Rivet's Shot is currently offline  Ahem A Rivet's Shot
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Senior Member
On Wed, 04 Mar 2020 16:40:19 GMT
nobody@example.org (Scott) wrote:

> On Wed, 4 Mar 2020 14:30:56 -0000 (UTC), Thomas Koenig
> <tkoenig@netcologne.de> wrote:
>

>> Now, assume you have a 1000 cubic foot tank which you empty with 5
>> gallons per minute, that gives you how many hours before the tank
>> is empty?
>
> Would it be easier to talk about moving 28,315 liters at 18.9 LPM?

Yes it's only one sum to do and no risk that it might have been
22.7 lpm that was meant by 5 gallons per minute. Of course the metric
designers might well have gone for a 30,000 litre tank and a 20 lpm pump
because they like round numbers too and when they use them everyone wins.

--
Steve O'Hara-Smith | Directable Mirror Arrays
C:\>WIN | A better way to focus the sun
The computer obeys and wins. | licences available see
You lose and Bill collects. | http://www.sohara.org/
Re: Superman, was: Chicago P.D. TV series--computer usage [message #391457 is a reply to message #391452] Wed, 04 March 2020 13:01 Go to previous messageGo to previous message
Charlie Gibbs is currently offline  Charlie Gibbs
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Registered: January 2012
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Senior Member
On 2020-03-04, Scott <nobody@example.org> wrote:

> On Wed, 4 Mar 2020 14:30:56 -0000 (UTC), Thomas Koenig
> <tkoenig@netcologne.de> wrote:
>
>> Scott <nobody@example.org> schrieb:
>>
>>> Metric has its uses, but there's nothing magical about it.
>>
>> I remember standing in a chemical plant in the US. The people
>> had conversion tables for units of volume on a note on the wall.
>>
>> Why?
>>
>> Well, the tanks they had were rated in cubic foot, and the
>> pumps were rated in gallons per minute.
>>
>> Now, assume you have a 1000 cubic foot tank which you empty with 5
>> gallons per minute, that gives you how many hours before the tank
>> is empty?
>
> Would it be easier to talk about moving 28,315 liters at 18.9 LPM?

Sheesh. Give him 2.54 centimeters and he'll take 1.609 kilometers.

--
/~\ Charlie Gibbs | Microsoft is a dictatorship.
\ / <cgibbs@kltpzyxm.invalid> | Apple is a cult.
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/ \ if you read it the right way. | Pick your poison.
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