Megalextoria
Retro computing and gaming, sci-fi books, tv and movies and other geeky stuff.

Home » Digital Archaeology » Electronic Gaming Arcana » Sega » Sega Genesis » Sega Nomad: current observations and comments
Show: Today's Messages :: Show Polls :: Message Navigator
E-mail to friend 
Switch to threaded view of this topic Create a new topic Submit Reply
Sega Nomad: current observations and comments [message #131365] Sat, 23 October 2010 02:49 Go to next message
Daniel W. Rouse Jr. is currently offline  Daniel W. Rouse Jr.
Messages: 12
Registered: October 2012
Karma: 0
Junior Member
I thought I'd just post some current observations about the Sega Nomad as a
current user. I bought the system a few months after its initial release and
I bought the Nomad-specific battery pack about a year later.

First of all, the Nomad system still works. The D-pad and buttons still
respond without any evidence of missing a button press, the LCD and
backlight are still working with only a small amount of image retention seen
when the background is really bright. Some vertical scrolling games are
showing some minor blurring when the screen pans left to right, but objects
are never blurred to the point of having trails, so that's probably just the
way a passive matrix LCD behaves as it gets older, I suppose.

I do need to find a suitable screen protector for the screen, because the
surface is showing several small and thin scratches that are very visible if
the screen is angled just right. I definitely don't want any deeper
scratches in that screen, since replacing it won't be easy with the system
well out of production. I also don't want numerous of air bubbles trapped
between the screen and screen protector, and that's the problem I've had so
far with several of the universal cut-to-size screen protectors.

The cartridge slot still has this issue where if the Nomad is somehow
shaken, the cartridge will shake and the game will lock up. This is IMHO a
design defect but it is easily fixed--using some sort of spacer fixes this
issue. (I just cut some thin flexible plastic to use as a spacer--the
cartridge is inserted first and then the spacer is inserted behind the
cartridge and still inside the cartridge slot to keep everything rigid.)
Every so often--after removing a cartridge and inserting another one--I'll
have to remove and reinsert that other cartridge two or three times to get
the game to load properly. (Once that's done, I'll put the spacer behind the
cartridge and begin playing the game.) I've not yet had any cartridge
totally fail to read, but I do have an odd situation with a Two Crude Dudes
cartridge where it has to be inserted so the contacts are only halfway into
the cartridge slot, not fully inserted into the cartridge slot. However,
that also applies to using that cartridge with an actual Genesis system as
well, and is not specific to the Nomad, so I figure it was just some weird
manufacturing variance with that specific cartridge.

For the built-in speaker, the volume has to be turned up at least halfway to
hear clear sound, except for extremely quiet environments. The sound from
that speaker is monophonic, and the speaker quality really isn't that great.
Using headphones is much better.

Headphones can be connected so the sound is much improved and that also
allows for stereo sound. The headphone input still works too, with sound
still heard from both the left and right headphone. Better quality
headphones give a better full range sound. It's also very easy to turn up
the volume very loud to enjoy the sound, but then turning up the volume too
loud seems to seriously reduce battery life. Also, turning the volume all
the way up seems to drive the amp into near clipping for distorted explosion
type sound effects, so it's probably not a good idea to turn the volume all
the way to maximum also to avoid possible hearing damage later on.

Battery life, I've had about 6 to 7 hours of battery life from a full charge
of the 1600 mAh Nomad battery pack--still working that many years later--and
about 8 or so hours from fully charged 2000 mAh NiMH batteries. The key
point is that this is when playing games at a moderate volume. When cranking
up the volume to near maximum, I've seen battery life as short as 2 hours
for smaller memory game cartridges (8 megabit and lower) and as low as 45
minutes of battery life for larger game cartridges (16 megabit or larger). I
need to find out if I'm overcharging the battery pack or not cycling the
NiMH batteries enough to get maximum capacity from them, or if that much
power is really consumed when the volume is turned that much louder (in
which case, I'll just make sure to bring two or three extra sets of charged
batteries and not play games that would take more than 2 hours to complete
when just using batteries).
Re: Sega Nomad: current observations and comments [message #131366 is a reply to message #131365] Sat, 23 October 2010 21:30 Go to previous messageGo to next message
robertva is currently offline  robertva
Messages: 3
Registered: December 2012
Karma: 0
Junior Member
On 10/23/2010 2:49 AM, Daniel W. Rouse Jr. wrote:
> I thought I'd just post some current observations about the Sega Nomad
> as a current user. I bought the system a few months after its initial
> release and I bought the Nomad-specific battery pack about a year later.
>
> First of all, the Nomad system still works. The D-pad and buttons still
> respond without any evidence of missing a button press, the LCD and
> backlight are still working with only a small amount of image retention
> seen when the background is really bright. Some vertical scrolling games
> are showing some minor blurring when the screen pans left to right, but
> objects are never blurred to the point of having trails, so that's
> probably just the way a passive matrix LCD behaves as it gets older, I
> suppose.
>
> I do need to find a suitable screen protector for the screen, because
> the surface is showing several small and thin scratches that are very
> visible if the screen is angled just right. I definitely don't want any
> deeper scratches in that screen, since replacing it won't be easy with
> the system well out of production. I also don't want numerous of air
> bubbles trapped between the screen and screen protector, and that's the
> problem I've had so far with several of the universal cut-to-size screen
> protectors.
>
> The cartridge slot still has this issue where if the Nomad is somehow
> shaken, the cartridge will shake and the game will lock up. This is IMHO
> a design defect but it is easily fixed--using some sort of spacer fixes
> this issue. (I just cut some thin flexible plastic to use as a
> spacer--the cartridge is inserted first and then the spacer is inserted
> behind the cartridge and still inside the cartridge slot to keep
> everything rigid.) Every so often--after removing a cartridge and
> inserting another one--I'll have to remove and reinsert that other
> cartridge two or three times to get the game to load properly. (Once
> that's done, I'll put the spacer behind the cartridge and begin playing
> the game.) I've not yet had any cartridge totally fail to read, but I do
> have an odd situation with a Two Crude Dudes cartridge where it has to
> be inserted so the contacts are only halfway into the cartridge slot,
> not fully inserted into the cartridge slot. However, that also applies
> to using that cartridge with an actual Genesis system as well, and is
> not specific to the Nomad, so I figure it was just some weird
> manufacturing variance with that specific cartridge.
>
> For the built-in speaker, the volume has to be turned up at least
> halfway to hear clear sound, except for extremely quiet environments.
> The sound from that speaker is monophonic, and the speaker quality
> really isn't that great. Using headphones is much better.
>
> Headphones can be connected so the sound is much improved and that also
> allows for stereo sound. The headphone input still works too, with sound
> still heard from both the left and right headphone. Better quality
> headphones give a better full range sound. It's also very easy to turn
> up the volume very loud to enjoy the sound, but then turning up the
> volume too loud seems to seriously reduce battery life. Also, turning
> the volume all the way up seems to drive the amp into near clipping for
> distorted explosion type sound effects, so it's probably not a good idea
> to turn the volume all the way to maximum also to avoid possible hearing
> damage later on.
>
> Battery life, I've had about 6 to 7 hours of battery life from a full
> charge of the 1600 mAh Nomad battery pack--still working that many years
> later--and about 8 or so hours from fully charged 2000 mAh NiMH
> batteries. The key point is that this is when playing games at a
> moderate volume. When cranking up the volume to near maximum, I've seen
> battery life as short as 2 hours for smaller memory game cartridges (8
> megabit and lower) and as low as 45 minutes of battery life for larger
> game cartridges (16 megabit or larger). I need to find out if I'm
> overcharging the battery pack or not cycling the NiMH batteries enough
> to get maximum capacity from them, or if that much power is really
> consumed when the volume is turned that much louder (in which case, I'll
> just make sure to bring two or three extra sets of charged batteries and
> not play games that would take more than 2 hours to complete when just
> using batteries).

Sega must have done a poor job publicizing that unit because I don't
recall hearing about it or seeing it in a store. I added the early style
drawer load CD unit to my Genesis console, but never bought many disks
for it.
Re: Sega Nomad: current observations and comments [message #131368 is a reply to message #131366] Sun, 24 October 2010 12:20 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Danners is currently offline  Danners
Messages: 1
Registered: October 2010
Karma: 0
Junior Member
>
> Sega must have done a poor job publicizing that unit because I don't
> recall hearing about it or seeing it in a store. I added the early style
> drawer load CD unit to my Genesis console, but never bought many disks
> for it.




The nomad really was poorly advertised in the US & Canada. This is due
in part to the Nomad being introduced while the GameGear was still
being retailed. Many retailers wouldn't advertise the Nomad before
selling out their GG stock. It's also interesting to note that the
"keys" present on all of the US genesis units (physically preventing
the use of Japanese carts) were absent on the nomad. For a nomad user
the only thing that prevents the use of a JP game is the language
barrier.
-D
Re: Sega Nomad: current observations and comments [message #131369 is a reply to message #131365] Mon, 25 October 2010 21:44 Go to previous messageGo to next message
BelPowerslave is currently offline  BelPowerslave
Messages: 264
Registered: November 2006
Karma: 0
Senior Member
> I thought I'd just post some current observations about the Sega Nomad
> as a current user.

It'll be the first real post this group has seen in a while....bravo!
Will crosspost this to RGVS as it's every bit as relevant there, and the
three people who still check it from time to time will probably be as
thrilled as I am to see it.

> I bought the system a few months after its initial
> release and I bought the Nomad-specific battery pack about a year later.

I used to own one...and back in the day I got a lot of mileage out of
it. On the road, at work(shhhhh) and just about any other place that I
didn't or couldn't have a full blow Genesis unit up and running. Thing
is, after I got my first laptop and started messing with emulation, the
Nomad almost instantly got put to the side. It wasn't that it was no
longer interesting, but that I didn't want to have to lug around this
thick-ass unit, however many carts I could fit in the carrying case, the
power brick, etc...especially when I could just simply take my laptop,
it's power supply and a Saturn controller(with USB adapter) and have the
entire Genesis library at my disposal.

That's not just the Nomad either, the Game Gear really only sees any
play when I'm sitting in bed and don't feel like getting out the laptop.
Said laptop has killed a lot of portable gaming systems for me.

> First of all, the Nomad system still works.

Indeed.

> The D-pad and buttons still
> respond without any evidence of missing a button press, the LCD and
> backlight are still working with only a small amount of image retention
> seen when the background is really bright. Some vertical scrolling games
> are showing some minor blurring when the screen pans left to right, but
> objects are never blurred to the point of having trails, so that's
> probably just the way a passive matrix LCD behaves as it gets older, I
> suppose.

My biggest issue with the LCD screen, and it's the same way with every
old school portable that uses that type of screen: The sort of vertical
ghosting. It's hard to explain...but let's say your on a completely
black background and your character is wearing some sort of
lighter-colored clothing. You'll get this sort of light "beam" coming
down from the top of the screen that goes all the way through your
character and then to the bottom of the screen. Like the pixels your
character has somehow messes with the vertical field he's standing in.
Nomad does it, Game Gear does it, original Black and Green GameBoy does
it, etc.

> I do need to find a suitable screen protector for the screen, because
> the surface is showing several small and thin scratches that are very
> visible if the screen is angled just right.

Oh man, isn't that shit the worst? I replaced mine a few times, and have
done so with the Game Gear as well.

> I definitely don't want any
> deeper scratches in that screen, since replacing it won't be easy with
> the system well out of production. I also don't want numerous of air
> bubbles trapped between the screen and screen protector, and that's the
> problem I've had so far with several of the universal cut-to-size screen
> protectors.

The actual screen plastic replacement isn't too hard...and I would think
that finding one of those cell phone "armor" sheets that would fit
wouldn't be too tough either. Try to get one of the ones you can peel
and re-set as they tend to go the distance.

> The cartridge slot still has this issue where if the Nomad is somehow
> shaken, the cartridge will shake and the game will lock up.

Yup. Every-single-fucking-time. Man, that's all I used to hear about
when I'd let people play it at work. It got to a point where I wouldn't
let anyone borrow it just due to the incessant whining that was sure to
follow due to that issue.

> This is IMHO
> a design defect but it is easily fixed--using some sort of spacer fixes
> this issue. (I just cut some thin flexible plastic to use as a
> spacer--the cartridge is inserted first and then the spacer is inserted
> behind the cartridge and still inside the cartridge slot to keep
> everything rigid.) Every so often--after removing a cartridge and
> inserting another one--I'll have to remove and reinsert that other
> cartridge two or three times to get the game to load properly. (Once
> that's done, I'll put the spacer behind the cartridge and begin playing
> the game.)

Ugh, sounds like a lot of work.

> I've not yet had any cartridge totally fail to read, but I do
> have an odd situation with a Two Crude Dudes cartridge where it has to
> be inserted so the contacts are only halfway into the cartridge slot,
> not fully inserted into the cartridge slot. However, that also applies
> to using that cartridge with an actual Genesis system as well, and is
> not specific to the Nomad, so I figure it was just some weird
> manufacturing variance with that specific cartridge.

Could be. I had similar issues myself.

> For the built-in speaker, the volume has to be turned up at least
> halfway to hear clear sound, except for extremely quiet environments.
> The sound from that speaker is monophonic, and the speaker quality
> really isn't that great. Using headphones is much better.

Yeah, that was the other thing people whined about back in the day.
First it was "Genesis audio sucks dick", then with the Nomad it was "I
wish I could turn it up more louder!!!11!!".

> Headphones can be connected so the sound is much improved and that also
> allows for stereo sound. The headphone input still works too, with sound
> still heard from both the left and right headphone. Better quality
> headphones give a better full range sound. It's also very easy to turn
> up the volume very loud to enjoy the sound, but then turning up the
> volume too loud seems to seriously reduce battery life.

Oh man, don't even get us started on battery life in the Nomad...

> Also, turning
> the volume all the way up seems to drive the amp into near clipping for
> distorted explosion type sound effects, so it's probably not a good idea
> to turn the volume all the way to maximum also to avoid possible hearing
> damage later on.

It seemed to crackle a bit on mine as well, when turned to the max.

> Battery life, I've had about 6 to 7 hours of battery life from a full
> charge of the 1600 mAh Nomad battery pack--still working that many years
> later--and about 8 or so hours from fully charged 2000 mAh NiMH
> batteries. The key point is that this is when playing games at a
> moderate volume. When cranking up the volume to near maximum, I've seen
> battery life as short as 2 hours for smaller memory game cartridges (8
> megabit and lower) and as low as 45 minutes of battery life for larger
> game cartridges (16 megabit or larger). I need to find out if I'm
> overcharging the battery pack or not cycling the NiMH batteries enough
> to get maximum capacity from them, or if that much power is really
> consumed when the volume is turned that much louder (in which case, I'll
> just make sure to bring two or three extra sets of charged batteries and
> not play games that would take more than 2 hours to complete when just
> using batteries).

I never had the actual battery pack...just that pack that you had to put
batteries in. It was a joke. Then again, I rarely ever played the thing
anywhere where an outlet wasn't readily available. ;)

Bel
--
Whip Ass Gaming: http://www.whipassgaming.com/

"Row, row, row your boat gently down the stream...whoa, I think my dingy
hanging out!"
- Lo Wang, Shadow Warrior
Re: Sega Nomad: current observations and comments [message #131370 is a reply to message #131366] Mon, 25 October 2010 21:46 Go to previous messageGo to next message
BelPowerslave is currently offline  BelPowerslave
Messages: 264
Registered: November 2006
Karma: 0
Senior Member
> Sega must have done a poor job publicizing that unit because I don't
> recall hearing about it or seeing it in a store.

It was the price that did it...$300 for a portable Genesis when the
system itself was, IIRC, at that point just $89.99. Plus, it was
released so late in the Genesis' lifespan...

> I added the early style
> drawer load CD unit to my Genesis console, but never bought many disks
> for it.

You should...the Sega CD is fucking awesome. Houses the definitive
version of most games that show up on it...

Bel
--
Whip Ass Gaming: http://www.whipassgaming.com/

"It has a few too many vampires and talking arms in it for my taste..."
- Sigmund Freud, after being dug up, brought back to life and then
asked for his thoughts on Metal Gear Solid 2
Re: Sega Nomad: current observations and comments [message #131371 is a reply to message #131368] Mon, 25 October 2010 21:47 Go to previous messageGo to next message
BelPowerslave is currently offline  BelPowerslave
Messages: 264
Registered: November 2006
Karma: 0
Senior Member
> The nomad really was poorly advertised in the US & Canada. This is due
> in part to the Nomad being introduced while the GameGear was still
> being retailed.

I think that was a poor choice too. There was nothing wrong with the
Game Gear...and throw in the SMS Adapter and it was downright awesome.
The Nomad should have played more...let us play Game Gear games on it,
SMS games on it...why not?

> Many retailers wouldn't advertise the Nomad before
> selling out their GG stock. It's also interesting to note that the
> "keys" present on all of the US genesis units (physically preventing
> the use of Japanese carts) were absent on the nomad. For a nomad user
> the only thing that prevents the use of a JP game is the language
> barrier.

That's true. I had played many a MD import in the thing, back when I had
one. IIRC, it didn't even need a spacer, you could just pop MD games
right in there(like with the 32X).

Bel
--
Whip Ass Gaming: http://www.whipassgaming.com/

"I love collecting big guns! It looks so Unreal!"
- Sam Stone, Serious Sam II
Re: Sega Nomad: current observations and comments [message #131455 is a reply to message #131369] Sun, 31 October 2010 02:08 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Daniel W. Rouse Jr. is currently offline  Daniel W. Rouse Jr.
Messages: 12
Registered: October 2012
Karma: 0
Junior Member
Quoting only selected portions of an entire post...

"BelPowerslave" <bel@whipassgaming.com> wrote in message
news:ia5bpf$hnk$1@news.eternal-september.org...
[snip...]

> I used to own one...and back in the day I got a lot of mileage out of it.
> On the road, at work(shhhhh) and just about any other place that I didn't
> or couldn't have a full blow Genesis unit up and running. Thing is, after
> I got my first laptop and started messing with emulation, the Nomad almost
> instantly got put to the side. It wasn't that it was no longer
> interesting, but that I didn't want to have to lug around this thick-ass
> unit, however many carts I could fit in the carrying case, the power
> brick, etc...especially when I could just simply take my laptop, it's
> power supply and a Saturn controller(with USB adapter) and have the entire
> Genesis library at my disposal.
>
I've got a case for the Nomad, and I usually only bring two cartridges with
me at a time each day. I mainly started using it when I got stuck using
public transportation to go to and from work--not much in the way of
conversation on buses so might as well either listen to music or else play
video games.

> That's not just the Nomad either, the Game Gear really only sees any play
> when I'm sitting in bed and don't feel like getting out the laptop. Said
> laptop has killed a lot of portable gaming systems for me.
>
>> First of all, the Nomad system still works.
>
> Indeed.
>
It seems to be a quality build for most of the unit except for the cartridge
slot, I think. I've even had it fall off onto the floor (not carpet) from
sitting in a chair height on a coach style bus and it still worked on power
on.

[snip...]

> My biggest issue with the LCD screen, and it's the same way with every old
> school portable that uses that type of screen: The sort of vertical
> ghosting. It's hard to explain...but let's say your on a completely black
> background and your character is wearing some sort of lighter-colored
> clothing. You'll get this sort of light "beam" coming down from the top of
> the screen that goes all the way through your character and then to the
> bottom of the screen. Like the pixels your character has somehow messes
> with the vertical field he's standing in. Nomad does it, Game Gear does
> it, original Black and Green GameBoy does it, etc.
>
I looked this up and it's called crosstalk. It's very noticable even on some
blue backgrounds such as the Dr. Robonik's Mean Bean Machine title screen,
vertical lines all the way through the screen except for where the actual
graphics are visible. Then again, this does not occur when playing Truxton,
yet it's all blue background in any in-space area that isn't one of the
asteroids.

[snip...]

> The actual screen plastic replacement isn't too hard...and I would think
> that finding one of those cell phone "armor" sheets that would fit
> wouldn't be too tough either. Try to get one of the ones you can peel and
> re-set as they tend to go the distance.
>
Some of those have some sort of adhesive on them, will that permanantly ruin
the finish of the screen? If possible, I'll also try to find a non-glare
screen protector because the screen is very reflective.

>> The cartridge slot still has this issue where if the Nomad is somehow
>> shaken, the cartridge will shake and the game will lock up.
>
> Yup. Every-single-fucking-time. Man, that's all I used to hear about when
> I'd let people play it at work. It got to a point where I wouldn't let
> anyone borrow it just due to the incessant whining that was sure to follow
> due to that issue.
>
>> This is IMHO a design defect but it is easily fixed--using some sort of
>> spacer fixes this issue. (I just cut some thin flexible plastic to use as
>> a spacer--the cartridge is inserted first and then the spacer is inserted
>> behind the cartridge and still inside the cartridge slot to keep
>> everything rigid.) Every so often--after removing a cartridge and
>> inserting another one--I'll have to remove and reinsert that other
>> cartridge two or three times to get the game to load properly. (Once
>> that's done, I'll put the spacer behind the cartridge and begin playing
>> the game.)
>
> Ugh, sounds like a lot of work.
>
Not really. I just insert the cartridge then insert the thin somewhat
flexible plastic behind the cartridge in the slot. Most carts load the first
or second insert and only a few have had to have the contacts cleaned.

[snip...]

>> Headphones can be connected so the sound is much improved and that also
>> allows for stereo sound. The headphone input still works too, with sound
>> still heard from both the left and right headphone. Better quality
>> headphones give a better full range sound. It's also very easy to turn up
>> the volume very loud to enjoy the sound, but then turning up the volume
>> too loud seems to seriously reduce battery life.
>
> Oh man, don't even get us started on battery life in the Nomad...
>
Seems like anything above halfway really drains the battery. Forget about
using alkaline batteries they seem to drain faster than Ni-MH. Then again,
with Ni-MH once that Low Batt light is lit it's just seconds before the game
turns off.

[snip...]

> I never had the actual battery pack...just that pack that you had to put
> batteries in. It was a joke. Then again, I rarely ever played the thing
> anywhere where an outlet wasn't readily available. ;)
>
For reference, the battery pack is model MK-6102 DC 7.2V 1600 mAh Ni-MH.
Re: Sega Nomad: current observations and comments [message #131456 is a reply to message #131366] Sun, 31 October 2010 02:13 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Daniel W. Rouse Jr. is currently offline  Daniel W. Rouse Jr.
Messages: 12
Registered: October 2012
Karma: 0
Junior Member
"robertva" <robert_c72@hotmail.invalid> wrote in message
news:ia027e$88b$1@news.eternal-september.org...
> On 10/23/2010 2:49 AM, Daniel W. Rouse Jr. wrote:
>> I thought I'd just post some current observations about the Sega Nomad
>> as a current user. I bought the system a few months after its initial
>> release and I bought the Nomad-specific battery pack about a year later.
>>
[snip...]

>
> Sega must have done a poor job publicizing that unit because I don't
> recall hearing about it or seeing it in a store. I added the early style
> drawer load CD unit to my Genesis console, but never bought many disks for
> it.

I don't recall any advertisement for the Nomad either on TVor the radio. In
fact, I think the only mentions of it seemed to be Internet Usenet
discussions and the main (if not the only?) retailer that was selling them
back then seemed to be Toys R Us.

Then sometimes the demo unit on display in the store was powered off and not
playing a game in demo mode, so then only a dedicated Sega Genesis fan
following the system closely and looking to specifically buy a Nomad would
have had any idea what it was and that it did play a great number of the
entire Genesis games available without having to buy an entirely separate
game library.
Re: Sega Nomad: current observations and comments [message #131457 is a reply to message #131368] Sun, 31 October 2010 02:16 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Daniel W. Rouse Jr. is currently offline  Daniel W. Rouse Jr.
Messages: 12
Registered: October 2012
Karma: 0
Junior Member
"Danners" <daniel.warner@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:60854ace-5c44-4008-9a53-839ea758cb02@g25g2000yqn.googlegroups.com...
>
>>
>> Sega must have done a poor job publicizing that unit because I don't
>> recall hearing about it or seeing it in a store. I added the early style
>> drawer load CD unit to my Genesis console, but never bought many disks
>> for it.
>
>
>
>
> The nomad really was poorly advertised in the US & Canada. This is due
> in part to the Nomad being introduced while the GameGear was still
> being retailed. Many retailers wouldn't advertise the Nomad before
> selling out their GG stock. It's also interesting to note that the
> "keys" present on all of the US genesis units (physically preventing
> the use of Japanese carts) were absent on the nomad. For a nomad user
> the only thing that prevents the use of a JP game is the language
> barrier.

It think the absence of the keys, while they may allow playing of import
MegaDrive games, may very well be the primary reason the cartridge has a
looser fit in the slot and therefore even less than a hard shake of the
system while playing a game can sometimes move the cartridge enough to cause
game lockup.
Re: Sega Nomad: current observations and comments [message #131459 is a reply to message #131455] Mon, 08 November 2010 15:07 Go to previous messageGo to next message
BelPowerslave is currently offline  BelPowerslave
Messages: 264
Registered: November 2006
Karma: 0
Senior Member
> I've got a case for the Nomad, and I usually only bring two cartridges
> with me at a time each day. I mainly started using it when I got stuck
> using public transportation to go to and from work--not much in the way
> of conversation on buses so might as well either listen to music or else
> play video games.

I had this CD case I used to carry mine around in. I could fit about 6
games in there with it. I've actually been on a bit of portable kick
lately...and have been trying to stretch my phone to the absolute
limit...but, unfortunately, that's not very far. I actually wouldn't
mind one of those Andriod phones that can run the various emulators...or
even an iPod Touch(if the prices would come down). Just something that
would allow me to play some decent games on.

> It seems to be a quality build for most of the unit except for the
> cartridge slot, I think. I've even had it fall off onto the floor (not
> carpet) from sitting in a chair height on a coach style bus and it still
> worked on power on.

Yeah, I had banged mine up a bit myself(don't tell KKC, who bought it
from me, though). ;)

> I looked this up and it's called crosstalk. It's very noticable even on
> some blue backgrounds such as the Dr. Robonik's Mean Bean Machine title
> screen, vertical lines all the way through the screen except for where
> the actual graphics are visible. Then again, this does not occur when
> playing Truxton, yet it's all blue background in any in-space area that
> isn't one of the asteroids.

It really annoys me...and the Game Gear seems to display it even more,
which kills me as I love my GG.

> Some of those have some sort of adhesive on them, will that permanantly
> ruin the finish of the screen? If possible, I'll also try to find a
> non-glare screen protector because the screen is very reflective.

Every one that I've either used personally, or put on someone's phone
for them, has just naturally stuck to the screens with a little bit of
water. You can then just peel them off and re-set them if needed. The
early ones came with some sort of "set it and NEVER take it off" apoxy,
IIRC. Just look for one that doesn't need any sort of adhesive and give
it a shot. I think you'll be satisfied with it.

> Not really. I just insert the cartridge then insert the thin somewhat
> flexible plastic behind the cartridge in the slot. Most carts load the
> first or second insert and only a few have had to have the contacts
> cleaned.

Well, it's good to hear that you've got a system in place. I don't know
why Sega felt it was a good idea to leave the cart with so much space to
flop around.

> Seems like anything above halfway really drains the battery. Forget
> about using alkaline batteries they seem to drain faster than Ni-MH.
> Then again, with Ni-MH once that Low Batt light is lit it's just seconds
> before the game turns off.

I wasn't real thrilled with any given battery I had used, but if you're
getting some mileage out of them, more power to ya!

> For reference, the battery pack is model MK-6102 DC 7.2V 1600 mAh Ni-MH.

Good to know. How much did it weigh in at? I swear we sold one on
RGA(with a Noamd), but I can't remember what the weight of it was.

Bel
--
Whip Ass Gaming: http://www.whipassgaming.com/

"Nautical nonsense be something I seek"
- Me
Re: Sega Nomad: current observations and comments [message #131624 is a reply to message #131459] Wed, 24 November 2010 00:45 Go to previous message
Daniel W. Rouse Jr. is currently offline  Daniel W. Rouse Jr.
Messages: 12
Registered: October 2012
Karma: 0
Junior Member
"BelPowerslave" <bel@whipassgaming.com> wrote in message
news:ib9lb2$tp3$1@news.eternal-september.org...
[snip...]

>> For reference, the battery pack is model MK-6102 DC 7.2V 1600 mAh Ni-MH.
>
> Good to know. How much did it weigh in at? I swear we sold one on RGA(with
> a Noamd), but I can't remember what the weight of it was.
>
The scale I have at home is showing the weight is about 1/2 pound.
  Switch to threaded view of this topic Create a new topic Submit Reply
Previous Topic: Anomalous Strider Returns cartridge label
Next Topic: Re: Anyone have any thoughts on the Arcade Master Plug 'n Play unit?
Goto Forum:
  

-=] Back to Top [=-
[ Syndicate this forum (XML) ] [ RSS ] [ PDF ]

Current Time: Mon Jul 13 07:35:02 EDT 2020

Total time taken to generate the page: 0.00514 seconds