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Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28208] Tue, 11 December 2012 04:26 Go to next message
cb is currently offline  cb
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Yes, accuracy in emulation leaves a lot to be desired - but I'll just
leave this here anyway:

http://www.masswerk.at/google60/

// Christian
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28211 is a reply to message #28208] Tue, 11 December 2012 05:43 Go to previous messageGo to next message
philo[1][2][3][4] is currently offline  philo[1][2][3][4]
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On 12/11/2012 03:26 AM, Christian Brunschen wrote:
> Yes, accuracy in emulation leaves a lot to be desired - but I'll just

> leave this here anyway:

>

> http://www.masswerk.at/google60/

>

> // Christian

>




+1

--
https://www.createspace.com/3707686
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28214 is a reply to message #28208] Tue, 11 December 2012 07:32 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Dario Niedermann is currently offline  Dario Niedermann
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Christian Brunschen <cb@mer.df.lth.se> wrote:

> Yes, accuracy in emulation leaves a lot to be desired - but I'll just

> leave this here anyway:


Too cool for this planet. Literally.

Not sure about the "Google" backronym (meh...) but everything else is
fantastic!

--
> head -n1 /etc/*-{version,release} && uname -mprs

Slackware 12.1.0
Linux 2.6.24.5-smp i686 AMD Turion(tm) 64 Mobile Technology MK-36
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28219 is a reply to message #28211] Tue, 11 December 2012 07:47 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Peter Flass is currently offline  Peter Flass
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On 12/11/2012 5:43 AM, philo wrote:
> On 12/11/2012 03:26 AM, Christian Brunschen wrote:

>> Yes, accuracy in emulation leaves a lot to be desired - but I'll just

>> leave this here anyway:

>>

>> http://www.masswerk.at/google60/

>>

>> // Christian

>>

>

>

>

> +1

>


LOL!



--
Pete
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28227 is a reply to message #28214] Tue, 11 December 2012 09:55 Go to previous messageGo to next message
GreyMaus is currently offline  GreyMaus
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On 2012-12-11, Dario Niedermann <dnied@tiscali.it> wrote:
> Christian Brunschen <cb@mer.df.lth.se> wrote:

>

>> Yes, accuracy in emulation leaves a lot to be desired - but I'll just

>> leave this here anyway:

>

> Too cool for this planet. Literally.

>

> Not sure about the "Google" backronym (meh...) but everything else is

> fantastic!

>


Fantastic

--
maus
.
.
....
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28229 is a reply to message #28219] Tue, 11 December 2012 10:21 Go to previous messageGo to next message
philo[1][2][3][4] is currently offline  philo[1][2][3][4]
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On 12/11/2012 06:47 AM, Peter Flass wrote:
> On 12/11/2012 5:43 AM, philo wrote:

>> On 12/11/2012 03:26 AM, Christian Brunschen wrote:

>>> Yes, accuracy in emulation leaves a lot to be desired - but I'll just

>>> leave this here anyway:

>>>

>>> http://www.masswerk.at/google60/

>>>

>>> // Christian

>>>

>>

>>

>>

>> +1

>>

>

> LOL!

>

>

>




I re-posted the link on Craig's List...computers and one of the
youngsters there thought that was really the way things were back then.
I mentioned that in 1965 a Google search consisted of a trip to the library!

--
https://www.createspace.com/3707686
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28244 is a reply to message #28208] Tue, 11 December 2012 12:14 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Anonymous
Karma:
Originally posted by: Ibmekon

On Tue, 11 Dec 2012 09:26:26 +0000 (UTC), cb@mer.df.lth.se (Christian
Brunschen) wrote:

>

> Yes, accuracy in emulation leaves a lot to be desired - but I'll just

> leave this here anyway:

>

> http://www.masswerk.at/google60/

>

> // Christian



Aaahhh, reminds me of when AJS - as the motorbike company - was my
memory aid for punching.

At one company we had a regular job of feeding a trolley full of trays
of cards from hospitals.
They were all coded on hand punches - and we made many corrections on
hand punches.


Carl Goldsworthy
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28247 is a reply to message #28229] Tue, 11 December 2012 12:54 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Michael Black is currently offline  Michael Black
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> On 12/11/2012 06:47 AM, Peter Flass wrote:

>> On 12/11/2012 5:43 AM, philo wrote:

>>> On 12/11/2012 03:26 AM, Christian Brunschen wrote:

>>>> Yes, accuracy in emulation leaves a lot to be desired - but I'll just

>>>> leave this here anyway:

>>>>

>>>> http://www.masswerk.at/google60/

>>>> =20

>>>> // Christian

>>>> =20

>>> =20

>>> =20

>>> =20

>>> +1

>>> =20

>> =20

>> LOL!

>> =20

>> =20

>> =20

>

>

>

> I re-posted the link on Craig's List...computers and one of the youngster=

s=20
> there thought that was really the way things were back then.

> I mentioned that in 1965 a Google search consisted of a trip to the libra=

ry!
>

I forget how I worded it, but once I wrote about books and libraries as if=
=20
they were webpages and the web. "They used to have this web called=20
Libraries and webpages called Books", or something like that. Actually I=
=20
don't think it was that long ago, and I was pointing out that there is=20
still a world beyond the internet.

Michael
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28249 is a reply to message #28247] Tue, 11 December 2012 13:01 Go to previous messageGo to next message
philo[1][2][3][4] is currently offline  philo[1][2][3][4]
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On 12/11/2012 11:54 AM, Michael Black wrote:
> On Tue, 11 Dec 2012, philo wrote:

>

>> On 12/11/2012 06:47 AM, Peter Flass wrote:

>>> On 12/11/2012 5:43 AM, philo wrote:

>>>> On 12/11/2012 03:26 AM, Christian Brunschen wrote:

>>>> > Yes, accuracy in emulation leaves a lot to be desired - but I'll just

>>>> > leave this here anyway:

>>>> >

>>>> > http://www.masswerk.at/google60/

>>>> >

>>>> > // Christian

>>>> >

>>>>

>>>>

>>>>

>>>> +1

>>>>

>>>

>>> LOL!

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>

>>

>>

>> I re-posted the link on Craig's List...computers and one of the

>> youngsters there thought that was really the way things were back then.

>> I mentioned that in 1965 a Google search consisted of a trip to the

>> library!

>>

> I forget how I worded it, but once I wrote about books and libraries as

> if they were webpages and the web. "They used to have this web called

> Libraries and webpages called Books", or something like that. Actually

> I don't think it was that long ago, and I was pointing out that there is

> still a world beyond the internet.

>

> Michael




Yes. however "hard-copy" encyclopedias are now a thing of the past I believe

--
https://www.createspace.com/3707686
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28253 is a reply to message #28249] Tue, 11 December 2012 13:42 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Peter Flass is currently offline  Peter Flass
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On 12/11/2012 1:01 PM, philo wrote:
> On 12/11/2012 11:54 AM, Michael Black wrote:

>> On Tue, 11 Dec 2012, philo wrote:

>>

>>> On 12/11/2012 06:47 AM, Peter Flass wrote:

>>>> On 12/11/2012 5:43 AM, philo wrote:

>>>> > On 12/11/2012 03:26 AM, Christian Brunschen wrote:

>>>> >> Yes, accuracy in emulation leaves a lot to be desired - but I'll just

>>>> >> leave this here anyway:

>>>> >>

>>>> >> http://www.masswerk.at/google60/

>>>> >>

>>>> >> // Christian

>>>> >>

>>>> >

>>>> >

>>>> >

>>>> > +1

>>>> >

>>>>

>>>> LOL!

>>>>

>>>>

>>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>> I re-posted the link on Craig's List...computers and one of the

>>> youngsters there thought that was really the way things were back then.

>>> I mentioned that in 1965 a Google search consisted of a trip to the

>>> library!

>>>

>> I forget how I worded it, but once I wrote about books and libraries as

>> if they were webpages and the web. "They used to have this web called

>> Libraries and webpages called Books", or something like that. Actually

>> I don't think it was that long ago, and I was pointing out that there is

>> still a world beyond the internet.

>>

>> Michael

>

>

>

> Yes. however "hard-copy" encyclopedias are now a thing of the past I

> believe

>


Probably better for it. I, like probably many others here, got sold a
set of encyclopedias when my wife and I were newlyweds. The saleslady
had us seeing visions of happy children clustered around the
encyclopedia doing their homework. After that we naturally bought the
update volume every year, waiting for the kids to come along and get old
enough to actually use the thing, as it got farther and farther out of
date. I think we finally trashed it about 20 years ago - just got tired
of lugging it when we moved and short on shelf space.

--
Pete
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28254 is a reply to message #28253] Tue, 11 December 2012 13:45 Go to previous messageGo to next message
philo[1][2][3][4] is currently offline  philo[1][2][3][4]
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On 12/11/2012 12:42 PM, Peter Flass wrote:


<snip>


>>

>>

>> Yes. however "hard-copy" encyclopedias are now a thing of the past I

>> believe

>>

>

> Probably better for it. I, like probably many others here, got sold a

> set of encyclopedias when my wife and I were newlyweds. The saleslady

> had us seeing visions of happy children clustered around the

> encyclopedia doing their homework. After that we naturally bought the

> update volume every year, waiting for the kids to come along and get old

> enough to actually use the thing, as it got farther and farther out of

> date. I think we finally trashed it about 20 years ago - just got tired

> of lugging it when we moved and short on shelf space.

>




Yes...the day an encyclopedia is printed it's already up to 18 months
out of date... however my sister and I were very glad my parents bought
them when we were teenagers, they got a lot of use.

When my daughter was a pre-teen my mother bought her a set too.
She used them, but when she was doing a paper for school used mostly
other sources. When she grew up and moved out she left them behind...
and the truth is I still use them from time to time.

--
https://www.createspace.com/3707686
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28269 is a reply to message #28208] Tue, 11 December 2012 14:17 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Joe Pfeiffer is currently offline  Joe Pfeiffer
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cb@mer.df.lth.se (Christian Brunschen) writes:

> Yes, accuracy in emulation leaves a lot to be desired - but I'll just

> leave this here anyway:

>

> http://www.masswerk.at/google60/

>

> // Christian


This is beautiful.
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28272 is a reply to message #28253] Tue, 11 December 2012 15:12 Go to previous messageGo to next message
hancock4 is currently offline  hancock4
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On Dec 11, 1:42 pm, Peter Flass <Peter_Fl...@Yahoo.com> wrote:

>> Yes. however "hard-copy" encyclopedias are now a thing of the past I

>> believe

>

> Probably better for it.  I, like probably many others here, got sold a

> set of encyclopedias when my wife and I were newlyweds.  The saleslady

> had us seeing visions of happy children clustered around the

> encyclopedia doing their homework.  After that we naturally bought the

> update volume every year, waiting for the kids to come along and get old

> enough to actually use the thing, as it got farther and farther out of

> date.  I think we finally trashed it about 20 years ago - just got tired

> of lugging it when we moved and short on shelf space.


Those old encyclopedias were very helpful for kids doing homework and
research.

Schools tended to discourage their use because they would rather have
students get their information from actual specific books, rather than
a generalized version in the encylcopedia.

As an aside, there are still kids sitting at a table in the public
library next to a pile of books, writing down notes by hand in a
spiral bound notebook.


There is, of course, a ton of information available on-line. But the
troubling thing is that there's far, far more information that is not
on-line, especially going back some years before it was common to
record entire books and newspapers on-line.

Going through reels of microfilm is a pain and I don't think it's done
much anymore. But there's a great deal of knowledge available only
through that medium.

One scary thing about on-line sources is that it may be updated at any
time. that may be good in correcting real errors, but bad in changing
history.
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28273 is a reply to message #28272] Tue, 11 December 2012 15:37 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Ben Pfaff is currently offline  Ben Pfaff
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hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com writes:

> Going through reels of microfilm is a pain and I don't think it's done

> much anymore. But there's a great deal of knowledge available only

> through that medium.


When I was a kid, my mom would drag me off to large research
libraries where she would work on her genealogy. While she did
that, I would often scan through reels of old newspapers on
microfilm, skipping everything but the comics.
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28275 is a reply to message #28254] Tue, 11 December 2012 16:04 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Michael Black is currently offline  Michael Black
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On Tue, 11 Dec 2012, philo  wrote:

> On 12/11/2012 12:42 PM, Peter Flass wrote:

>

>

> <snip>

>

>

>>>

>>>

>>> Yes. however "hard-copy" encyclopedias are now a thing of the past I

>>> believe

>>>

>>

>> Probably better for it. I, like probably many others here, got sold a

>> set of encyclopedias when my wife and I were newlyweds. The saleslady

>> had us seeing visions of happy children clustered around the

>> encyclopedia doing their homework. After that we naturally bought the

>> update volume every year, waiting for the kids to come along and get old

>> enough to actually use the thing, as it got farther and farther out of

>> date. I think we finally trashed it about 20 years ago - just got tired

>> of lugging it when we moved and short on shelf space.

>>

>

>

>

> Yes...the day an encyclopedia is printed it's already up to 18 months out of

> date... however my sister and I were very glad my parents bought them when we

> were teenagers, they got a lot of use.

>

> When my daughter was a pre-teen my mother bought her a set too.

> She used them, but when she was doing a paper for school used mostly other

> sources. When she grew up and moved out she left them behind...

> and the truth is I still use them from time to time.

>

All I got was the neighbor's encyclopedias, if I was lucky.

I had to go to the library and hope the needed volume was in the set(s)
that were available to take home. Or live with whatever articles I could
find in The National Geographic, a complete set going back to the forties
at least still being in the house.

Michael
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28278 is a reply to message #28249] Tue, 11 December 2012 16:35 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Howard S Shubs is currently offline  Howard S Shubs
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In article <ka7sde$aa8$1@dont-email.me>,
=?ISO-8859-1?Q?philo=A0?= <philo@privcy.not> wrote:

> Yes. however "hard-copy" encyclopedias are now a thing of the past I believe


Yes, Brittanica stopped publishing hardcopy in 2010, I think.

--
May joy be yours all the days of your life! - Phina
We are but a moment's sunlight, fading in the grass. - The Youngbloods
Those who eat natural foods die of natural causes. - Kperspective
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28296 is a reply to message #28272] Tue, 11 December 2012 16:50 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Rod Speed is currently offline  Rod Speed
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<hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com> wrote in message
news:305c44d6-6539-4a99-8945-f64f20ae93de@w3g2000yqj.googlegroups.com...
> On Dec 11, 1:42 pm, Peter Flass <Peter_Fl...@Yahoo.com> wrote:

>

>>> Yes. however "hard-copy" encyclopedias are now a thing of the past I

>>> believe

>>

>> Probably better for it. I, like probably many others here, got sold a

>> set of encyclopedias when my wife and I were newlyweds. The saleslady

>> had us seeing visions of happy children clustered around the

>> encyclopedia doing their homework. After that we naturally bought the

>> update volume every year, waiting for the kids to come along and get old

>> enough to actually use the thing, as it got farther and farther out of

>> date. I think we finally trashed it about 20 years ago - just got tired

>> of lugging it when we moved and short on shelf space.

>

> Those old encyclopedias were very helpful for kids doing homework and

> research.

>

> Schools tended to discourage their use because they would rather have

> students get their information from actual specific books, rather than

> a generalized version in the encylcopedia.

>

> As an aside, there are still kids sitting at a table in the public

> library next to a pile of books, writing down notes by hand in a

> spiral bound notebook.

>

>

> There is, of course, a ton of information available on-line. But the

> troubling thing is that there's far, far more information that is not

> on-line, especially going back some years before it was common to

> record entire books and newspapers on-line.

>

> Going through reels of microfilm is a pain and I don't think it's done

> much anymore.


Still quite a bit with genealogy.

> But there's a great deal of knowledge available only through that medium.


Dunno, even the old newspapers are now being OCR here.

I found that when doing some genealogy myself and discovered
that my grandfather had ended up in court when he refused to pay
a bill at a restaurant in the 30s and got into a punchup over that.

Found my mother's post school education results in the 30s that way too.

> One scary thing about on-line sources is that it may be updated at any

> time. that may be good in correcting real errors, but bad in changing

> history.
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28297 is a reply to message #28278] Tue, 11 December 2012 19:00 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Rod Speed is currently offline  Rod Speed
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Howard S Shubs <howard@shubs.net> wrote

>> Yes. however "hard-copy" encyclopedias are now a thing of the past I

>> believe


> Yes, Brittanica stopped publishing hardcopy in 2010, I think.


But it was never the only publisher of encyclopedia.

I don’t believe that they have all stopped producing hard copy.
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28298 is a reply to message #28272] Tue, 11 December 2012 19:40 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Peter Flass is currently offline  Peter Flass
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On 12/11/2012 3:12 PM, hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com wrote:
> On Dec 11, 1:42 pm, Peter Flass <Peter_Fl...@Yahoo.com> wrote:

>

>>> Yes. however "hard-copy" encyclopedias are now a thing of the past I

>>> believe

>>

>> Probably better for it. I, like probably many others here, got sold a

>> set of encyclopedias when my wife and I were newlyweds. The saleslady

>> had us seeing visions of happy children clustered around the

>> encyclopedia doing their homework. After that we naturally bought the

>> update volume every year, waiting for the kids to come along and get old

>> enough to actually use the thing, as it got farther and farther out of

>> date. I think we finally trashed it about 20 years ago - just got tired

>> of lugging it when we moved and short on shelf space.

>

> Those old encyclopedias were very helpful for kids doing homework and

> research.

>

> Schools tended to discourage their use because they would rather have

> students get their information from actual specific books, rather than

> a generalized version in the encylcopedia.

>

> As an aside, there are still kids sitting at a table in the public

> library next to a pile of books, writing down notes by hand in a

> spiral bound notebook.

>

>

> There is, of course, a ton of information available on-line. But the

> troubling thing is that there's far, far more information that is not

> on-line, especially going back some years before it was common to

> record entire books and newspapers on-line.

>

> Going through reels of microfilm is a pain and I don't think it's done

> much anymore. But there's a great deal of knowledge available only

> through that medium.


Some of the film is being scanned and put online. For example the US
censuses are now available in image form from various sources.
Unfortunately, I see Google has stopped scanning old newspapers from
microfilm. What archive stuff is available is very helpful, I wish
they'd continue.

I do agree that the web has a very short memory. Lots of stuff from the
70s and 80s and earlier just doesn't exist.

--
Pete
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28299 is a reply to message #28273] Tue, 11 December 2012 19:41 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Peter Flass is currently offline  Peter Flass
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On 12/11/2012 3:37 PM, Ben Pfaff wrote:
> hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com writes:

>

>> Going through reels of microfilm is a pain and I don't think it's done

>> much anymore. But there's a great deal of knowledge available only

>> through that medium.

>

> When I was a kid, my mom would drag me off to large research

> libraries where she would work on her genealogy. While she did

> that, I would often scan through reels of old newspapers on

> microfilm, skipping everything but the comics.

>


I sometimes get so fascinated by the old stuff, including the
advertising, that I forget what I was looking for in the first place.

--
Pete
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28316 is a reply to message #28273] Tue, 11 December 2012 20:26 Go to previous messageGo to next message
hancock4 is currently offline  hancock4
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On Dec 11, 3:37 pm, Ben Pfaff <b...@cs.stanford.edu> wrote:

> When I was a kid, my mom would drag me off to large research

> libraries where she would work on her genealogy.  While she did

> that, I would often scan through reels of old newspapers on

> microfilm, skipping everything but the comics.


When we were young, we visited a major library for the first time on
our own. We discovered the microfilm section and asked to see the
newspaper of the day of our birth*. The librarian was very nice and
showed us how to use the readers. We were fascinated by it. Much of
the news was beyond us--we didn't know that much history--but looking
at the ads and photographs was interesting. Also, it seemed that in
earlier years the newspaper was more lurid in crime reporting.

*Actually, the newspaper of the day _after_ our birth would've been
better, so we could've seen what actually happened on our birthday.
The newspaper published on our birthday had the news of the day
before.

Returning to computers, a nearby college library has microfilm of old
Datamation and other business technology magazines of the 1950s and
1960s. Neat stuff. I think IBM's announcement of the first disk
drive merited only a small mention--who knew what a groundbreaking
thing it was.
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28317 is a reply to message #28275] Tue, 11 December 2012 20:31 Go to previous messageGo to next message
hancock4 is currently offline  hancock4
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On Dec 11, 4:04 pm, Michael Black <et...@ncf.ca> wrote:

> I had to go to the library and hope the needed volume was in the set(s)

> that were available to take home.  Or live with whatever articles I could

> find in The National Geographic, a complete set going back to the forties

> at least still being in the house.


Our libraries never loaned out encyclopedias--there were for in-
library use only. But they had copy machines--amazingly for the same
price as today.

The Natl Geo was made into a CD-ROM set with indexing. (I picked a
set up at a yard sale. The pages are in a low-res jpg.) It includes
the ads, which are often more interesting than the articles. They did
a couple of good pieces on the telephone system. I think in the 1970s
or 1980s they covered the computer; I don't know if anything appeared
in the 1950s. I think IBM did advertise its 701 in it.

In Driver's Ed we had to write a report, and I had a Natl Geo with a
feature article on the Interstate System. I used that as the basis of
my report.
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28319 is a reply to message #28247] Tue, 11 December 2012 16:16 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Shmuel (Seymour J.) M is currently offline  Shmuel (Seymour J.) M
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In <alpine.LNX.2.02.1212111252110.27506@darkstar.example.org>, on
12/11/2012
at 12:54 PM, Michael Black <et472@ncf.ca> said:

> "They used to have this web called Libraries


That's a funny way to spell gopher.

--
Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz, SysProg and JOAT <http://patriot.net/~shmuel>

Unsolicited bulk E-mail subject to legal action. I reserve the
right to publicly post or ridicule any abusive E-mail. Reply to
domain Patriot dot net user shmuel+news to contact me. Do not
reply to spamtrap@library.lspace.org
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28323 is a reply to message #28298] Tue, 11 December 2012 20:38 Go to previous messageGo to next message
hancock4 is currently offline  hancock4
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On Dec 11, 7:40 pm, Peter Flass <Peter_Fl...@Yahoo.com> wrote:

> Some of the film is being scanned and put online.  For example the US

> censuses are now available in image form from various sources.


What is fascinating is that old census are searchable, based on
handwritten (cursive) entries. They just put out 1940 data. On one
of the commercial genology websites I found entries for my family
instantly. (My library offers free access.) There is a ton of other
stuff too, liked scanned old phone books.

> Unfortunately, I see Google has stopped scanning old newspapers from

> microfilm.  What archive stuff is available is very helpful, I wish

> they'd continue.


There's a company called Proquest that has scanned and indexed the
entire New York Times, including ads. Many libraries offer it. Also,
the NYT website itself allows searching the entire history, and
certain date ranges, such as 100 years ago, may be called up free.
Articles from other date ranges have a fee; but free to subscribers.

I don't know if other newspapers are available. One downside about my
town's paper is that there is no index, one has to know the date and
serially search through the microfilm reel of the associated date
range. Sometimes minor news articles took a day or two to appear.

One thing that hasn't changed: Articles on political troubles read
exactly as they do now, only the names are different.
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28324 is a reply to message #28299] Tue, 11 December 2012 20:45 Go to previous messageGo to next message
hancock4 is currently offline  hancock4
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On Dec 11, 7:41 pm, Peter Flass <Peter_Fl...@Yahoo.com> wrote:

> I sometimes get so fascinated by the old stuff, including the

> advertising, that I forget what I was looking for in the first place.


Absolutely.

The advertising is very informative in its own right. For one, we get
an idea of prices of specific goods and services in a particular
time. Two, we see what was 'hot' in a time span. Three, we get a
feel for the details of various goods and services--details we might
not realize for today. For instance, way back a new house came with
_nothing_--things like a stove and heater were optional. Old TVs
required a rooftop antenna, which may have been an extra charge and
not cheap to install.

Then we can read about things that have relevance today. For
instance, today we may be arguing whether to tear down some major
building---in the past we'll find an article arguing whether or not to
build it in the first place. (Sometimes the underlying issues remain
the same!)

In the want ads, we'll see that jobs were separated for men and women
(in some locales also separated by white and colored). We'll see jobs
that no longer exist.

In the business pages, we'll see an emphasis on "nuts and bolts"
smokestack industries, including literally companies that makes nuts
and bolts. We'll see ads by such companies, with the plant in the
background proudly spewing lots of smoke from its stacks--a sign back
then of prosperity.
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28327 is a reply to message #28272] Tue, 11 December 2012 21:53 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Joe Pfeiffer is currently offline  Joe Pfeiffer
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Anybody else remember the "Young People's Science Encyclopedia"? My
parents got that for me, and I spent hours and hours reading it.

The single article I remember best was the one on Newton's Second Law,
which suggested standing on a wagon and throwing bricks as an experiment
to demonstrate it. I wound up learning more about static friction and
absorbing recoil than I did about the Second Law as a result....
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28328 is a reply to message #28299] Tue, 11 December 2012 22:53 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Michael Black is currently offline  Michael Black
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On Tue, 11 Dec 2012, Peter Flass wrote:

> On 12/11/2012 3:37 PM, Ben Pfaff wrote:

>> hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com writes:

>>

>>> Going through reels of microfilm is a pain and I don't think it's done

>>> much anymore. But there's a great deal of knowledge available only

>>> through that medium.

>>

>> When I was a kid, my mom would drag me off to large research

>> libraries where she would work on her genealogy. While she did

>> that, I would often scan through reels of old newspapers on

>> microfilm, skipping everything but the comics.

>>

>

> I sometimes get so fascinated by the old stuff, including the advertising,

> that I forget what I was looking for in the first place.

>

Someone told me a few years ago that she doesn't follow links from a page
(I don't know if that means at all or just sometimes0 because she gets
distracted. I said "yes, it's like reading a dictionary", where you are
looking for something but on the way get distracted by words you see,
which then can also lead you to other words, and then you've forgotten the
word you were originally looking up.

Michael
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28329 is a reply to message #28317] Tue, 11 December 2012 23:01 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Michael Black is currently offline  Michael Black
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On Tue, 11 Dec 2012, hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com wrote:


> The Natl Geo was made into a CD-ROM set with indexing. (I picked a

> set up at a yard sale. The pages are in a low-res jpg.) It includes

> the ads, which are often more interesting than the articles. They did

> a couple of good pieces on the telephone system. I think in the 1970s

> or 1980s they covered the computer; I don't know if anything appeared

> in the 1950s. I think IBM did advertise its 701 in it.

>

The ads are interesting because they often were related to the idea of
travel in early days (Zenith Transoceanic portable radios, cruise ships,
promotion of vacation spots). But I think they also came and went. When
I was a kid they were segregated and in small quantitites, I thought they
either disappeared for a while later, or were very few, then in more
recent times they've been more obvious and intrusive.

Up till a certain point, the magazine had no cover photo, and then for a
bit longer, it was just a small one. I'm not sure when it went to the
full color cover, maybe the start of the fifties, though the 1959 one I
have handy is still a small photo. But until they went to a full cover
photo, the cover was the table of contents. I thought that made a better
model for a webpage than the grapic intensive pages we got (as I've
mentioned, and someone else mentioned just a couple of weeks ago here, a
webpage isn't a magazine trying to win the attention of the passerby at a
newsstand). Too often, a webapge had a fixed format, still does, and
instead of headlines, you get broad categories ('news", "contact us",
whatever) that could be done away with by having headlines right on the
front page.

I keep missing the National Geographic set, they issue a new one, the
price is high, then it drops, but soon after it's sold out. I am tempted
since then I could cut back the collection.

Michael
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28339 is a reply to message #28319] Tue, 11 December 2012 23:06 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Michael Black is currently offline  Michael Black
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On Tue, 11 Dec 2012, Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz wrote:

> In <alpine.LNX.2.02.1212111252110.27506@darkstar.example.org>, on

> 12/11/2012

> at 12:54 PM, Michael Black <et472@ncf.ca> said:

>

>> "They used to have this web called Libraries

>

> That's a funny way to spell gopher.

>

But not enough people now know about gopher. The same people who know
about gopher know about libraries, while who knows about the younger
generation.

Michael
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28340 is a reply to message #28323] Tue, 11 December 2012 23:21 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Michael Black is currently offline  Michael Black
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On Tue, 11 Dec 2012, hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com wrote:

> On Dec 11, 7:40 pm, Peter Flass <Peter_Fl...@Yahoo.com> wrote:

>

>> Some of the film is being scanned and put online.  For example the US

>> censuses are now available in image form from various sources.

>

> What is fascinating is that old census are searchable, based on

> handwritten (cursive) entries. They just put out 1940 data. On one

> of the commercial genology websites I found entries for my family

> instantly. (My library offers free access.) There is a ton of other

> stuff too, liked scanned old phone books.

>

How do they make it searchable? The US Patent Office has patents online,
but until a certain point in the seventies, they are scans so there is
much less one can search for. That reflects reality, after a certain
point they were filed in electronic form so the work is done and no extra
effort needed.

What I'm surprised about is how much stuff there is about my great, great,
great grandfather, and the first generation after that. That reflects the
amount of "real" content there was before the internet. But I can't tell,
from what's there, how important he and the first generation is. He wrote
some books, so that may be the big factor. I was looking in one book
about native american speeches, and there's one from an Okanagan about
getting a wolf pelt of 'silver". And by then I'd caught on, the quote is
from my great, great, great grandfather's book about the pacific northwest
200 years ago.


>> Unfortunately, I see Google has stopped scanning old newspapers from

>> microfilm.  What archive stuff is available is very helpful, I wish

>> they'd continue.

>

> There's a company called Proquest that has scanned and indexed the

> entire New York Times, including ads. Many libraries offer it. Also,

> the NYT website itself allows searching the entire history, and

> certain date ranges, such as 100 years ago, may be called up free.

> Articles from other date ranges have a fee; but free to subscribers.

>

In the old days, "University Microfilm" or something like that would
microfilm magazines and I suppose newspapers, and sell the contents. I
don't know what deal they had with the magazines and newspapers. I
thought that's what was found at libraries.

Then they, or some other company, started in providing digital versions of
magazines, which were as costly if not more so. That National Geograhic
complete scan is only around 60.00, that ROlling Stone complete scan I
bought a few years ago was a hundred initially (but by the time I bought
it some months later, it was 20.00, as a clearance item at the bookstore),
and while I'm sure that reflects partially an expectation of more copies
sold, I suspect it's also that techniques of scanning have improved, to
make it less expensive. So those scans fifteen or 20 years ago ended up
being expesnive because they were done early. Or maybe not. The idea is
great, but if I have to pay hundreds of dollars to get a complete run of
an amateur radio magazine, it's not that tempting.

> I don't know if other newspapers are available. One downside about my

> town's paper is that there is no index, one has to know the date and

> serially search through the microfilm reel of the associated date

> range. Sometimes minor news articles took a day or two to appear.

>

With google's scans, I'm pretty sure the indexing isn't perfect. I know I
appeared in the local paper that is scanned at google, yet I can't find
it. Sounds a bit like the google usenet search.

Michael
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28341 is a reply to message #28327] Tue, 11 December 2012 23:30 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Michael Black is currently offline  Michael Black
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On Tue, 11 Dec 2012, Joe Pfeiffer wrote:

> Anybody else remember the "Young People's Science Encyclopedia"? My

> parents got that for me, and I spent hours and hours reading it.

>

No, but we did have an Audubon Encyclopedia. Useful if you needed
something related to nature, useless for everything else.

> The single article I remember best was the one on Newton's Second Law,

> which suggested standing on a wagon and throwing bricks as an experiment

> to demonstrate it. I wound up learning more about static friction and

> absorbing recoil than I did about the Second Law as a result....

>

Somehow the World Book Encyclopedia sticks in my mind. Not only did they
have those sections with the clear plastic overlays, but they had things
like brief instructions on making a thermocouple? to make electricity
from heat. There was enough detail to make one, though it was more about
showing off the concept than powering anything.

That may reflect the fact that the Encyclopedia Britannica wasn't allowed
to go home, while the World Book was. I don't remember bringing any home
just to read, but I do remember spending time just looking through the
volumes at random.

I dragged home a set in the mid-nineties from a used book sale, having to
arrange to come back later for them so I could get a shopping cart to
bring them home. They included some of the annual updates. And then for
some reason, I let someone talk me out of them, she wanted them for her
daughter. In retrospect I dont' know why I did it, she asked like I had
no use for them, yet I made the effort to bring them home in the first
place (and spent 20.00 on them). And not that many years later, when she
moved, she tossed them. Logistics aside are the only reason I didn't drag
home another set when I had the chance. I like the indepenence of having
that sort of thing around, which is why I do have various single-volume
reference books.

Michael
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28342 is a reply to message #28329] Tue, 11 December 2012 23:32 Go to previous messageGo to next message
hancock4 is currently offline  hancock4
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On Dec 11, 11:03 pm, Michael Black <et...@ncf.ca> wrote:

> The ads are interesting because they often were related to the idea of

> travel in early days (Zenith Transoceanic portable radios, cruise ships,

> promotion of vacation spots).  But I think they also came and went.  When

> I was a kid they were segregated and in small quantitites, I thought they

> either disappeared for a while later, or were very few, then in more

> recent times they've been more obvious and intrusive.


In the classifieds, there were little ads and photos from military
schools which appeared every month for years. I kind of wondered
about them, though it didn't seem very attractive. (FWIW, I did know
some people who went to a military school's summer camp and they
enjoyed it immensely. Their school was used in a movie.)

Certain fullpage ads appeared only from time to time, such as Pullman,
Greyhound, a cemetary memorial maker. But other ads appeared every
month, such as a nice ad from the Bell System on an inside cover.
During the war years they asked people not to use their phone. After
the war they touted their new technologies.

I think someone from Bell's family was on the Geographic board of
directors. I believe the Bell ads ceased before Divestiture.





> I keep missing the National Geographic set, they issue a new one, the

> price is high, then it drops, but soon after it's sold out.  I am tempted

> since then I could cut back the collection.


I hope they've improved the resolution and functionality over the set
I purchased. Had I purchased it full price at retail I would've been
very disappointed.

For whatever reason, I find myself looking at the pictures and the
ads, but rarely reading the text of articles.

I think back in the 1950s they had to hand paint the Kodachrome
images--they could not directly reproduce them from the slide. Later
on the photos had a much more natural look to them.
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28343 is a reply to message #28342] Wed, 12 December 2012 00:21 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Michael Black is currently offline  Michael Black
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On Tue, 11 Dec 2012, hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com wrote:

> On Dec 11, 11:03 pm, Michael Black <et...@ncf.ca> wrote:

>

>> The ads are interesting because they often were related to the idea of

>> travel in early days (Zenith Transoceanic portable radios, cruise ships,

>> promotion of vacation spots).  But I think they also came and went.  When

>> I was a kid they were segregated and in small quantitites, I thought they

>> either disappeared for a while later, or were very few, then in more

>> recent times they've been more obvious and intrusive.

>

> In the classifieds, there were little ads and photos from military

> schools which appeared every month for years. I kind of wondered

> about them, though it didn't seem very attractive. (FWIW, I did know

> some people who went to a military school's summer camp and they

> enjoyed it immensely. Their school was used in a movie.)

>

Yes, there was the period of the classified ads, which were more like
small display ads. Those military schools somehow seemed interesting at
the time, but that was the time of GI Joe and playing with war toys. For
that matter, when we were in Europe in 1965, I remember a lot of military
all over the place. So the military schools seemed somehow appealing, in
though likely because it was detached from actual war or even the
discipline that the places probably inovked on the students.

> Certain fullpage ads appeared only from time to time, such as Pullman,

> Greyhound, a cemetary memorial maker. But other ads appeared every

> month, such as a nice ad from the Bell System on an inside cover.

> During the war years they asked people not to use their phone. After

> the war they touted their new technologies.

>

Don't forget the Coca Cola ads on the back cover, I suspect they were
memorable because they varied, rather than just putting the same ad back
there month after month.


> I think someone from Bell's family was on the Geographic board of

> directors. I believe the Bell ads ceased before Divestiture.

>

Yes, a couple of generations of Bell family were involved, I think to this
day.
>

>

>

>

>> I keep missing the National Geographic set, they issue a new one, the

>> price is high, then it drops, but soon after it's sold out.  I am tempted

>> since then I could cut back the collection.

>

> I hope they've improved the resolution and functionality over the set

> I purchased. Had I purchased it full price at retail I would've been

> very disappointed.

>

I find it hard to believe they'd go back and rescan the older issues, but
who knows. If the pictures aren't good resolution, that's hardly in favor
of scrapping the paper magazines.

> For whatever reason, I find myself looking at the pictures and the

> ads, but rarely reading the text of articles.

>

THere hasn't been a month since I was born that the magazine hasnt'
arrived each month. And once I could read, mosto of the time I'd look at
the photos, and just read the captions. You could get a lot from
the captions. I'm sure initially after I could read I didn't have the
patience for anything but the captions, but I kept up the habit, I'm not
sure I missed that much. Even today, most articles I dont' read, but I
will check the photos, read the captions.

That's another thing in the internet age, I've seen people post endless
photos that dont' convey much, while being picky about photos and adding
good captions make the photos more than just the photos. The photos often
don't say much by themselves.


> I think back in the 1950s they had to hand paint the Kodachrome

> images--they could not directly reproduce them from the slide. Later

> on the photos had a much more natural look to them.

>


I think it was earlier. I'm not sure when they went to full color
photography.

There have been some books about the magazine, I ahve one somewhere
around, that likely tells when they went fully color. The hardcover index
(they'd issue them every so often to keep up with the magazine) I think
had some introdcutory material that might say when the change happened,
perhaps those are included in the electronic version?

I seem to recall it wasn't just lack of color film, but maybe that black
and white didn't need as much fussing as color originally did, and if
someone was off in darkest Africa or Antarctica for the summer, they
couldn't get the color film developed fast enough?

Michael
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28344 is a reply to message #28340] Wed, 12 December 2012 00:26 Go to previous messageGo to next message
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Michael Black <et472@ncf.ca> wrote
> hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com wrote

>> Peter Flass <Peter_Fl...@Yahoo.com> wrote


>>> Some of the film is being scanned and put online. For example the

>>> US censuses are now available in image form from various sources.


>> What is fascinating is that old census are searchable, based on

>> handwritten (cursive) entries. They just put out 1940 data. On

>> one of the commercial genology websites I found entries for my

>> family instantly. (My library offers free access.) There is a ton of

>> other stuff too, liked scanned old phone books.


> How do they make it searchable?


By OCRing it. That's what happens with old newspapers too.

> The US Patent Office has patents online, but

> until a certain point in the seventies, they are

> scans so there is much less one can search for.


The old newspapers are scans too, and are searchable anyway.

> That reflects reality, after a certain point they were filed in

> electronic form so the work is done and no extra effort needed.


It isnt that hard to OCR it accurately enough to be useful.

> What I'm surprised about is how much stuff there is about my great, great,

> great grandfather, and the first generation after that. That reflects the

> amount of "real" content there was before the internet. But I can't tell,

> from what's there, how important he and the first generation is. He wrote

> some books, so that may be the big factor. I was looking in one book

> about native american speeches, and there's one from an Okanagan about

> getting a wolf pelt of 'silver". And by then I'd caught on, the quote is

> from my great, great, great grandfather's book about the pacific northwest

> 200 years ago.


>>> Unfortunately, I see Google has stopped scanning old newspapers from

>>> microfilm. What archive stuff is available is very helpful, I wish

>>> they'd continue.


>> There's a company called Proquest that has scanned and indexed the

>> entire New York Times, including ads. Many libraries offer it. Also,

>> the NYT website itself allows searching the entire history, and

>> certain date ranges, such as 100 years ago, may be called up free.

>> Articles from other date ranges have a fee; but free to subscribers.


> In the old days, "University Microfilm" or something like that would

> microfilm magazines and I suppose newspapers, and sell the contents.

> I don't know what deal they had with the magazines and newspapers.

> I thought that's what was found at libraries.


> Then they, or some other company, started in providing digital versions of

> magazines, which were as costly if not more so. That National Geograhic

> complete scan is only around 60.00, that ROlling Stone complete scan I

> bought a few years ago was a hundred initially (but by the time I bought

> it some months later, it was 20.00, as a clearance item at the bookstore),

> and while I'm sure that reflects partially an expectation of more copies

> sold, I suspect it's also that techniques of scanning have improved, to

> make it less expensive. So those scans fifteen or 20 years ago ended up

> being expesnive because they were done early. Or maybe not. The idea is

> great, but if I have to pay hundreds of dollars to get a complete run of

> an amateur radio magazine, it's not that tempting.


>> I don't know if other newspapers are available. One downside about my

>> town's paper is that there is no index, one has to know the date and

>> serially search through the microfilm reel of the associated date

>> range. Sometimes minor news articles took a day or two to appear.


> With google's scans, I'm pretty sure the indexing isn't perfect. I know I

> appeared in the local paper that is scanned at google, yet I can't find

> it. Sounds a bit like the google usenet search.
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28361 is a reply to message #28272] Wed, 12 December 2012 03:21 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Mike Spencer is currently offline  Mike Spencer
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hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com writes:

> One scary thing about on-line sources is that it may be updated at any

> time. that may be good in correcting real errors, but bad in changing

> history.


My 1910 Brittanica (with the two-volume update for after WW I in 192x)
is a badly battered & tattered and there are no articles on border
gateway protocol or neural nets or Justin Bieber. But it's hours and
hours of fascinating reading. Even the lists of authors of the heavier
articles are an intriguing read.

Sic transit gloria mundi.

--
Mike Spencer Nova Scotia, Canada
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28363 is a reply to message #28361] Wed, 12 December 2012 04:55 Go to previous messageGo to next message
GreyMaus is currently offline  GreyMaus
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On 2012-12-12, Mike Spencer <mds@bogus.nodomain.nowhere> wrote:
>

> hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com writes:

>

>> One scary thing about on-line sources is that it may be updated at any

>> time. that may be good in correcting real errors, but bad in changing

>> history.

>

> My 1910 Brittanica (with the two-volume update for after WW I in 192x)

> is a badly battered & tattered and there are no articles on border

> gateway protocol or neural nets or Justin Bieber. But it's hours and

> hours of fascinating reading. Even the lists of authors of the heavier

> articles are an intriguing read.

>

> Sic transit gloria mundi.

>


First such book, rather than the ones about general knowledge, I saw was
Pears Cyclopedia (spelling, afaik), from before the Great War. I was
fascinated to see the maps, and comparing them to what was then current.
That one (Pears) was a sorta general-education effort by a company whose
main effort was making soap, "Coal Tar Soap" (Wonder if they still call it
that?).. Small volume, very well written, good attitude.



--
maus
.
.
....
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28364 is a reply to message #28342] Wed, 12 December 2012 04:55 Go to previous messageGo to next message
GreyMaus is currently offline  GreyMaus
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On 2012-12-12, hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com <hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com> wrote:
> On Dec 11, 11:03 pm, Michael Black <et...@ncf.ca> wrote:

>

>> The ads are interesting because they often were related to the idea of

>> travel in early days (Zenith Transoceanic portable radios, cruise ships,

>> promotion of vacation spots).  But I think they also came and went.  When

>> I was a kid they were segregated and in small quantitites, I thought they

>> either disappeared for a while later, or were very few, then in more

>> recent times they've been more obvious and intrusive.

>

> In the classifieds, there were little ads and photos from military

> schools which appeared every month for years. I kind of wondered

> about them, though it didn't seem very attractive. (FWIW, I did know

> some people who went to a military school's summer camp and they

> enjoyed it immensely. Their school was used in a movie.)

>

> Certain fullpage ads appeared only from time to time, such as Pullman,

> Greyhound, a cemetary memorial maker. But other ads appeared every

> month, such as a nice ad from the Bell System on an inside cover.

> During the war years they asked people not to use their phone. After

> the war they touted their new technologies.

>

> I think someone from Bell's family was on the Geographic board of

> directors. I believe the Bell ads ceased before Divestiture.

>


Grosvenor?(sp).... There was a lot of hassle for years between the
really commercial magazines and NG, which was sort of a family club.
My mother, who had worked in the US, greatly admired the US work attitude
, used bring home secondhand NG whenever she visited Dublin.

Gro* were inlaws of Bells, or summat like that. The Duke of Westminster's
family name, AFAIK, is like that, one of the wealthiest people in the UK.

>

>

>

>

>> I keep missing the National Geographic set, they issue a new one, the

>> price is high, then it drops, but soon after it's sold out.  I am tempted

>> since then I could cut back the collection.

>

> I hope they've improved the resolution and functionality over the set

> I purchased. Had I purchased it full price at retail I would've been

> very disappointed.

>

> For whatever reason, I find myself looking at the pictures and the

> ads, but rarely reading the text of articles.

>

> I think back in the 1950s they had to hand paint the Kodachrome

> images--they could not directly reproduce them from the slide. Later

> on the photos had a much more natural look to them.



--
maus
.
.
....
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28375 is a reply to message #28363] Wed, 12 December 2012 06:07 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Nick Spalding is currently offline  Nick Spalding
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greymausg@mail.com wrote, in <slrnkcgl3j.20u.greymausg@gmaus.org>
on 12 Dec 2012 09:55:34 GMT:

> On 2012-12-12, Mike Spencer <mds@bogus.nodomain.nowhere> wrote:

>>

>> hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com writes:

>>

>>> One scary thing about on-line sources is that it may be updated at any

>>> time. that may be good in correcting real errors, but bad in changing

>>> history.

>>

>> My 1910 Brittanica (with the two-volume update for after WW I in 192x)

>> is a badly battered & tattered and there are no articles on border

>> gateway protocol or neural nets or Justin Bieber. But it's hours and

>> hours of fascinating reading. Even the lists of authors of the heavier

>> articles are an intriguing read.

>>

>> Sic transit gloria mundi.

>>

>

> First such book, rather than the ones about general knowledge, I saw was

> Pears Cyclopedia (spelling, afaik), from before the Great War. I was

> fascinated to see the maps, and comparing them to what was then current.

> That one (Pears) was a sorta general-education effort by a company whose

> main effort was making soap, "Coal Tar Soap" (Wonder if they still call it

> that?).. Small volume, very well written, good attitude.


Different maker, it was Wright's Coal Tar Soap. Now made in Turkey and
called Wright's Traditional Soap.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_Tar_Soap>

Pears is the transparent one. Still made, slightly differently.
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pears_soap>
--
Nick Spalding
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28377 is a reply to message #28316] Wed, 12 December 2012 07:38 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Peter Flass is currently offline  Peter Flass
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On 12/11/2012 8:26 PM, hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com wrote:
>

> Returning to computers, a nearby college library has microfilm of old

> Datamation and other business technology magazines of the 1950s and

> 1960s. Neat stuff. I think IBM's announcement of the first disk

> drive merited only a small mention--who knew what a groundbreaking

> thing it was.

>



Good to know, because (AFAIK) Datamation is not yet online and it noted
a lot of events that are now historic(al). Google has some
Computerworlds, but if they're not doing more scaanning someone elsde
will have to pick up the slack.


--
Pete
Re: Search Google, 1960:s-style [message #28379 is a reply to message #28323] Wed, 12 December 2012 07:42 Go to previous messageGo to previous message
Peter Flass is currently offline  Peter Flass
Messages: 7970
Registered: December 2011
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Senior Member
On 12/11/2012 8:38 PM, hancock4@bbs.cpcn.com wrote:
>

> I don't know if other newspapers are available. One downside about my

> town's paper is that there is no index, one has to know the date and

> serially search through the microfilm reel of the associated date

> range. Sometimes minor news articles took a day or two to appear.


All to _Time_ is online back to volume 1 issue 1 in 1923, also free to
subscribers.

My one complaint about the pay sites is that they charge fairly hefty
fees (IMHO) for even small articles. $5.00 for a two-paragraph
newspaper article seems a little excessive.

>

> One thing that hasn't changed: Articles on political troubles read

> exactly as they do now, only the names are different.

>


Sad but true.


--
Pete
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